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Alrin

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How Encyclopedia
« on: April 25, 2006, 09:23:06 AM »

This is a pinned topic for all HoW Encyclopedia contributions.

1: Index
2: (Ratn'gary, Yusuf, Helen Jacoby, Rogen, Tathar, Irabek, Kitty, Randolph Jacoby, Yagu, Udell)
3: The Hammer of Tholin, Mac Mordain Cadal
4: The Family ConDoin
5: Queg, Wiñet
6: Kesh, Brijaners, Ashunta, Isalani, Yar-Rin, Durbin
7: Novindus, Pavilion of the Gods/City of the Dead Gods/Keepers of the Gate, Maharta, Lanada
8: (Gardell, Lady Isashani, Malac's Cross, Aal, aelebera, Navon du Sandau, Murmandamus)
9: (Ishap's Dawn, Abdur Rachman Memo Hazara-Khan, Natombi, Incomo, Loranough, Harulth, Hantukama, Ironpass, Ayaki Acoma)
10: Rillanon, Salador, Rodez, Krondor, Sarth/Abbey at Sarth/That Which Was Sarth
11: Northlands, Armengar, Moraelin, Northwarden, Highcastle
12: Yabon/Messenger Corps, , Ylith, Crydee, Carse, Bordon
13: Roldem/Master's Court, Disputed Lands, Olasko/Fortress of Despair, Bardac's Holdfast, Latagore/Kendrick's, Orosini, Orodon/Queala
14. Land's End, Port Vykor, Tomb of the Hopeless, Vale of Dreams, Stardock
« Last Edit: May 27, 2006, 06:23:11 PM by Alrin »
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Alrin

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How Encyclopedia
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2006, 03:32:51 AM »

Quote from: Alrin
Ratn'gary - Also known as the Pavilion of the Gods. About three days north of the Ratn'gary Gulf. Home to the Necropolis - the City of the Dead Gods, where all the gods who perished in the Chaos Wars wait - and high above, the Pillars of Heaven - upon whose peaks rests the Pavilion of the Gods, where the living gods reside.
Quote from: Great One
Yusuf - Human male; Keshian; A dyer in Stink Town of Krondor. A spy that works for Hazara-Khan the head of the Keshian Intelligence. Now uses his position to work for the Crawler, and tries to blackmail Jazhara into being his operative in Krondor's court.
Quote from: Tal
Helen Jacoby - Wife of Randolph Jacoby. Mother of Natally and Willem Jacoby. Partner of Roo; later wife of Luis de Savon.
Quote from: Alrin
Rogen - Blind Seer who raised the fosterling Gamina.
Quote from: Alrin
Tathar - Elven Spellweaver. First advisor to the Elf Queen. Oldest friend and counsel to King Aidan.
Quote from: Alrin
Irabek - A small city in the Westlands of Novindus, it was the second city assaulted by the Emerald Queen's army. Lent its name to the Forest of Irabek - darker and more fearful than the Green Heart - which lay between the Ratn'gary and the Sothu mountains.
Quote from: Myddrun
Kitty - Katherine Graves: Wife of Eric Von Darkmoor. Once a Mocker, but ended up working for James Jameson as a spy at the Broken Shield Inn.
Quote from: Alrin
Randolph Jacoby - Merchant of Krondor. Brother of Timothy Jacoby. Husband of Helen.
Spoiler: show
Died after taking a crossbow bolt intended for his brother, Tim.
- Rise of a Merchant Prince spoiler
Quote from: coeshaw
Yagu: Chief gardener on the estate of Netoha
Quote from: Alrin
Udell - Younger son of Dolgan, of Tholin's line.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2006, 08:29:03 AM by Alrin »
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Kikori

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How Encyclopedia
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2006, 02:22:27 PM »

The Hammer of Tholin - Dwarven artefact and symbol of the Dwarven King. Once lost, it was retrieved by Dolgan from the Mac Mordain Cadal.

Mac Mordain Cadal - The mines of the Dwarven Kings. Said to be filled with innumerable treasures, although some claim it is haunted.  It is said only Dwarves can navigate the mines without meeting peril.
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Alrin

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How Encyclopedia
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2006, 09:00:31 AM »

The following post contains spoilers. You've been warned.

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The Family ConDoin

Rulers have been underlined

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-750 years before Riftwar
Dannis ConDoin - First King of the Isles.
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-500 years before Riftwar
Delong ConDoin - Delong the Great. Brought the banner of the Kingdom to the mainland.
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-250 years before Riftwar
Borric ConDoin I - Borric the First. Kingdom General who fought against Jon the Pretender of Bas-Tyra.
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??? years before Riftwar
Henry ConDoin III - Minor King of the Isles written of in a history book.
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-Approx. 100 years before Riftwar
Nicholas ConDoin - Extended the Kingdoms boundaries to include the former Keshian province of Bosania. First Duke of Crydee.
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Rodric ConDoin III - Married to Beautrice and Janica. King of the Isles
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Erland ConDoin - Brother of Rodric III. Prince of Krondor.
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Borric ConDoin - Grandson of Nicholas. Brother of Malcom. Husband of Catherine. Duke of Crydee.

Malcom ConDoin - Brother of Borric.
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Rodric ConDoin IV - Son of Rodric III and Janica. King of the Isles.  
(*Riftwar begins 13th year of Rodric's reign.)
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Martin ConDoin - Known as Longbow. Son of Borric and Margaret (serving girl). Duke of Crydee.

Lyam ConDoin I - Son of Borric and Catherine. Married to Magda. King of the Isles.

Arutha ConDoin - Son of Borric and Catherine. Prince of Krondor

Carline ConDoin - Daughter of Borric and Catherine. Wife of Laurie of Tyr-Sog.

Pug ConDoin - Adopted son of Borric. Cousin to the Royal family. The Black Sorcerer.

Anita ConDoin - Daughter of Erland and Alicia.
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William ConDoin - Son of Pug and Katala. Cousin to the Royal family.

Gamina ConDoin - Fosterling of Rogen. Adopted daughter of Pug. Wife of James (Jimmy the Hand).
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Borric ConDoin - Son of Arutha and Anita. Twin brother of Erland. Married to Yasmine. King of the Isles.
(Serpentwar begins 5th year of Borric's reign)

Erland ConDoin - Son of Arutha and Anita. Twin brother of Borric.

Randolph ConDoin - Son of Lyam and Magda. Accidentally drowned as a youth.

Elena ConDoin - Daughter of Arutha & Anita. Wife of Gunther, Duke of Ran.

Nicholas ConDoin - Youngest son of Arutha and Anita.

Margaret ConDoin - Daughter of Martin and Briana.

Marcus ConDoin - Son of Martin and Briana. Duke of Crydee.
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Patrick ConDoin - Son of Borric and Yasmine. Married to Francine. King of the Isles.
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Ryan ConDoin - Son of Patrick and Francine. King of the Isles.
(#Darkwar begins approx. 15th year of Ryan's reign)
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Matthew ConDoin - Son of Ryan ConDoin.  
(Speculative: Exists in Talon of the Silver Hawk; not King of Foxes)

Robert ConDoin -  Heir apparent to the throne. Prince of Krondor.
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* Magician begins 11th year of Rodric's reign. The war itself begins year 13.
# Based on material found in Talon of the Silver Hawk.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2006, 09:36:20 AM by Alrin »
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2006, 05:53:18 AM »

Queg:

Founded as an outpost of the Empire of Great Kesh. Not a colony, as was Bosania, the Free Cities and the Far Coast, or a conquered people as were those of the Jal-Pur or the Vale of Dreams. Those primitives who lived on the island were quickly absorbed by the garrison placed there to protect Keshian interests in the Bitter Sea.

The garrison was pure Keshian, men from the Inner Legions. Their leader was Lord Vax, fourth son of the Emperor of Great Kesh. It's said that when the Empire withdrew from the Far Coast and what are now the Free Cities, when the legion was called home to crush the rebellion in the Keshian Confederacy, he refused to abandon his people. Though, Keshian historians submit the garrison had successfully revolted ten years earlier.

This tiny nation of former Keshians, mixed with local islanders through intermarriage, would have been something of a joke save for two factors. The first was that the island was volcanic and had some of the richest farmland north of the Vale of Dreams, surrounded by unusual local currents so that it was the most clement climate in the Bitter Sea - meaning it was self-sufficient when it came to feeding its populace - and the second was its navy.

Queg has the largest navy in the Bitter Sea, a fact of life constantly driven home by its regular harassment and occasional seizure of Kingdom, Keshian, and Free Cities ships. Besides Queg's claim that it has territorial rights throughout the Bitter Sea - a legacy of that long-ago claim on this sea by Kesh - there is the additional irritation of its pirates. Often galleys without flags will raid along the Kingdom coast or the Free Cities, down even along the far western coast of the Empire in a bold year, and at every turn the Emperor and Senate of Queg deny knowledge.

One of Queg's greatest exports lay in quarries at the center of the island. Marble of unsurpassed quality is cut there and exported at great expense to nobles in the Kingdom, Kesh, and the Free Cities who want impressive facades on their homes, or stunning fireplaces. But on the island itself it is used everywhere. The common buildings are fashioned from stone and plaster, but the larger buildings on the hilltops all glisten white in the morning sun.

In the cold months, the locals wear wool tunic and trousers, but in the hot months of spring, summer, and early fall, a light cotton garb, called a toga, was the preferred dress of the wealthy.


[div align=\"center\"]"We are mighty in culture, but otherwise we are a poor nation, surrounded on all sides by enemies."[/div]
[div align=\"right\"]- Lord Vasarius; Rage of a Demon King[/div]

If a noncitizen sets foot on Quegan soil without a Quegan sponsor, they're property for the first Quegan with a strong enough arm to toss a rope around them and make it stick. To resist, even to save one's life, is assault on a citizen. Whatever gold one had would be forfeit to the state. Unless one has powerful allies there, noncitizens of Queg have no rights.

The language of Queg is a variant of the ancient Keshian spoken at the time of the Empire's withdrawal from the Bitter Sea, so it is related to the languages of Yabon and the Free Cities. It is also similar to the language spoken in the land of Novindus.


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Wiñet

The third continent on Midkemia. Sometime ages ago, part of the continent rose up some 600 feet creating an isolated plateau. The lower portion of the continent was settled by refugees from Triagia, during the purging of the Ishapian Temple of the Heretics of Al-maral.

After the events of the Serpentwar Saga the upper portion (the Ethel-Duath) was populated by the Saaur lizard-men, a race of nomadic warriors created by the Valheru, Alma-Lodaka but left on the world of Shila during the time of the Chaos Wars.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 11:39:44 AM by Alrin »
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Alrin

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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2006, 08:02:39 AM »

Kesh:

In ancient times, the original people of Kesh were but one of many nations around the Overn Deep. When pressed by enemies, they fled to the plateau upon which the palace rests. It eventually became tradition that all who serve the Empire, but who are not of true Keshian stock, live in the city-below the palace. By the time of the Darkwar, this tradition had been tempered - for certain non-Trueblood nobles were now permitted to stay within the upper city, though it was rare and counted as an enormous privilege.


The stones of the cities streets are worn with the passage of raiders, captive chieftains, and triumphant captains before Rillanon had come under conDoin rule. And conquering armies under legendary generals passed through to bring subjugation to other nations when Rillanon and Bas-Tyra first began their trade wars, two city-states seeking dominance over what would come to be called the Kingdom Sea. Kesh is old. Very old. It holds the echoes of centuries of history, a mighty nation rising to become a great empire. There was a culture that produced artists and musicians here when the Kingdom's ancestors were fishermen who had just turned their hand to raiding neighbouring islands from their safe harbour at Rillanon.

The palace of the Emperor occupies the entire upper half of a great plateau that overlooked the Overn Deep and the lower city at the foot of the tableland. Ages ago, Keshian rulers constructed a massive fortress on top of this prominence, a highly defensible position to protect their small city below. Over the centuries the original fortress has been added to, reconstructed and expanded, until the entire top of the plateau was covered. Tunnels extend down into the soil, some leading into the lower city. Upon walls within the palace, murals of bright colour can be found in the stylized Keshian fashion, displaying warriors, kings and gods, many depicted with animal heads, for the Keshians give aspects to the gods that differed markedly from how they are perceived in the Kingdom.

The Kingdom's independence from Kesh has always rested upon one point: Kesh can't afford the losses she would suffer as a result of invading a nation a third her own size. And the mauling the Kingdom would inflict upon Kesh for whatever brief victory Kesh might enjoy would make her vulnerable in turn to revolt by the Confederacy, or attack from the Eastern Kingdoms. But never for a moment did Kesh live in fear of military adventure from the Kingdom. The spectre of the Kingdom invading the Empire was never contemplated, for if the consequences of invading the Kingdom would be ruinous to Kesh, the consequences of invading the Empire for the Kingdom would be even more disastrous.


Some hundred years or more before the Riftwar, the island province of Queg successfully revolted. Ten years later, a revolt in the south of the Empire, in those lands known as the Keshian Confederacy, had allowed the northern province of Bosania, today split into the Kingdom Duchy of Crydee and the Free Cities of Natal to break free of the Empire.

An occasional border clash over the lands in the rich Vale of Dreams has certainly become commonplace in the history of Triagia's two greatest nations, with Kesh once seeking to annex Kingdom lands, sending Imperial forces to occupy the narrow strip of land north of the Peaks of Tranquillity between Deep Taunton and the eastern point where the mountains met the sea. An army under the command of Guy du Bas-Tyra crushed the Imperial forces at Deep Taunton, ending all Kesh's attempts to capture a port on the Kingdom Sea.

Around the time of the Battle of Sethanon, all the nations south of the two mountain ranges that traverse the continent - the Girdle of Kesh - had been brought to heel after twenty years of successful revolt. The self-proclaimed Keshian Confederacy had been made to pay dearly for their rebellion. Thousands had been put to death and the devastation had been unequalled by anything in Kingdom history - entire cities were put to the torch and their populations sold into slavery. Entire peoples, races, languages, and cultures had ceased to exist, except among the slaves.

After the Serpentwar, Kesh moved against and almost destroyed Krondor, seeking to advantage itself in its seemingly never-ending struggle with its northern neighbour. The attempt was ended by Pug, known as the Black Sorcerer, who was Duke of Stardock at that time, and vassal to the Crown of the Kingdom of the Isles (this is the infamous incident that lead to Pug renouncing his oaths to the Kingdom).

At the time of the Darkwar, Roldem's navy has combined with the Kingdom of the Isles' great Eastern Fleet, supported by a loose agreement among the small eastern Kingdoms to come to one another's aid against any Keshian incursion, which keeps the Empire contained in the east. In the west, it is the Kingdom's Western Fleet and the navy of the Empire of Queg, plus the economic strength of the Free Cities of Natal that keeps Kesh in check. For the time being the political landscape over the entire continent of Triagia is stable for the first time in centuries. Which means that the fighting now runs along economic and political lines, a great deal less overt, but no less nasty and dangerous than a military confrontation.


The red and golden-speckled falcon is the royal bird of Kesh, the most revered and holy symbol of the Empire's power. It was a bird thought to be at one time almost extinct. Only a male can perch upon the royal sun, the symbol of the Empire.


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Brijaners :

Seamen from Brijane, and the towns along the shore below the Grimstone Mountains. They're raiders and traders who ply the Great Sea from Kesh to the Eastern Kingdoms in their long ships - and even across the Endless Sea, the stories claim. They are proud, violent men, and they worship the spirits of their dead mothers. All Brijaner women are seers and priestesses and the men believe their ghosts come to guide their ships and therefore hold all women sacred.


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Ashunta:

The home of the Ashunta is in the west of the Empire, rolling grasslands no one else wants, but a good way for slavers and renegades to move around without running foul of the Imperial army. The Ashuntai are a strange people. They are taught to despise warm feelings, and to love a woman is to be weak. Their women are considered property. They are bartered and bought and sold. The Ashuntai do not count them human. They sell their female children, and if a woman troubles a man, he is free to do with her as he wishes, including killing her. They bind their women with collars of leather and lead them on chains in public. They do not let them wear clothing, save a loincloth, even in cold weather. It is also part of their culture that if you can successfully steal a woman from a rival - carrying her away to your own home - you may keep her. It is an open question who are the best horsemen in the Empire, the Ashuntai or those of the Jal-Pur.


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Isalani:

The citizens of Isalan, one of the nations in the province of Shing Lai, south of the Girdle of Kesh. A strange bunch, they're mystics - seers, shamans, fortune-tellers and visionaries; they are also the biggest bunch of thieves and swindlers in Kesh.

The Isalani are masters of kata, and it is the heart of the arts they practice. It is a sense of movement and it taps the power around you, to give you balance and ease at the moment you need to draw upon that power. It is an ancient art form, and it can be used to harmonize the self with the universe, as well as for self-defense.


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Yar-Rin:

Yar-Rin was located in the foothills of the eastern terminus of the Pillars of the Stars - the range of mountains that served as an absolute marker for the border of the Empire of Great Kesh - in a lovely valley that separated the mountains from the mammoth forest known as The Green Reaches.

A few huts lined the roadway into the village square, and three large buildings dominated. One was the mill, on the far side of the square, one a shop, and the other an inn, the sign of the Sleeping Rooster.


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Durbin:

Durbin commands the only arable farm-land between the Vale of Dreams and the foothills of the Trollhome Mountains, as well as the one safe harbour to be found from Land's End to Ranom. Along the south coast of the Bitter Sea the treacherous reefs wait for ships and boats unfortunate enough to be caught in the unexpected northern winds that spring up routinely. For centuries, Durbin has been home to pirates, wreckers and scavengers, and slavers.

When the desert men of the Jal-Pur had conquered Durbin centuries ago, they had found their gateway to the trade of the Bitter Sea, and when the Empire had conquered the desert men, Durbin was the capital city of the desert men. Now it is the home of an Imperial governor, but nothing had changed. It is still Durbin.

The Guild of Slavers, the Wreckers Guild, and the Captains of the Coast, known as the Three,  rule in Durbin. It is they, not the Imperial Governor, who decide who is to live and die, who is to work, who is to eat. That is as it has always been. Before the Empire. Before the desert men. Always.

Durbin is the most honest city in the world. Those who live there lie at night with doors unlocked and may walk the streets in safety. For he who steals in Durbin is a fool, and either dead or a slave within days. So the Three have decreed.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2006, 05:19:50 PM by Alrin »
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Alrin

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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2006, 08:27:33 AM »

Novindus:

The continent of Novindus is roughly divided into thirds. Novindus is a land of city-states and independent rulers, each claiming whatever lands they were able to subjugate by force of arms.

The Riverlands comprised the heart of the continent, being the most heavily populated portion of Novindus. The Vedra River ran southeast from the Sothu Mountains through this rich farm belt. To the west of the river was the Plain of Djams, a relatively inhospitable grassland populated by nomads, more primitive than the Jeshandi. Beyond was a gigantic range of mountains, the Ratn'gary - the Pavilion of the Gods - which ran north from the sea to the mighty Forest of Irabek, which lay between the Ratn'gary and the Sothu mountains.

It was beyond this north-south barrier of mountains and forest that the Westlands lay. The average residents of the Eastlands knew little about the Westlands and those who lived there. Even less was known of the Island Kingdom of Pa'jkamaka, which lay five hundred miles beyond. Only a handful of bold traders had ever visited those distant cities.

The Eastlands was comprised of the Hotlands, as the desert was called, and the Great Steppes, the home of the Jeshandi, as well as the City of the Serpent River, where power resides with a loose confederation of clans, tribal people related to the Jeshandi. For a time they were dominated by the Overlord, a man who had come to power forty-four years before the Serpentwar, and who kept his position by pitting one clan against another. He was in truth a pawn of the Lady Clovis.

Ten years before the Serpentwar, a great army began massing in that part of Novindus called the Westlands. Calling themselves the armies of the Emerald Queen, they swept down from an unknown place along the shore of the ocean called the Green Sea. The first city to fall was Point Punt. The conquerors gave the defenders of the city called Point Punt the choice of serving or one day's grace to withdraw. That is normal, but what wasn't normal was that every man in the city was ordered to serve under arms or watch his wife and children, mother and father impaled before his eyes. After the first executions, the entire male population of the city joined that army.

They then marched on the city of Irabek, and after bitter fighting it fell. Then Port Sulth, then all the towns along the Manstra River. From Point Punt they launched an invasion along the river Dee, seeking to enter the area known as the Midlands, and they were unopposed until reaching the foothills of the Ratn'gary mountains. Dwarves - much like the race who live in the west of the Kingdom - turned them back for three years. At last this army of invaders threw up a stable frontier of fortifications and sought another way across the continent.

They came through the Forest of Irabek, darker and more fearful than the Kingdom's Green Heart. They died in numbers getting through, but at last they did and then they struck the city of Hamsa. The King of Hamsa warred for five years with this army and hired mercenaries from as far away as the City of the Serpent River at the other end of the continent. It was the biggest battle so far. Two hundred and sixty-five days of siege. After the first hundred and fifty days, the defenders ate hard bread and drank foul water and survived. After two hundred, they ate maggots in green meat, and they ate insects when they could be found and were thankful. They were close to eating their dead. When Hamsa fell, of six thousand defenders, four thousand swore oaths to the invaders.

The war was fought for over ten years, from the Westlands through the Riverlands into the Eastlands, and nothing was left behind. Some people hid, and others just lived too far away to bother with, so there were some survivors. But most of those left behind were dead. No cities left, and only a few towns with a building standing. If a farmer lived enough distance away, he might have a crop, unless those fleeing the cities ate it. And the sickness... With that many dead, it had to come. Some got the runs so bad they died from them; couldn't even hold down a drink of water in their stomachs. Others got the black pox. Or some got fevers with no herbs or temple priests around to heal them. It was pure misery.

The effects of 'the War' were still being felt decades later. Many of the labourers were the children of people driven from their homes by the advancing horde. The enemy had enlisted every able-bodied man they found, giving them the choice at sword-point: to fight for them, or die. Women were taken as whores, cooks, and menial labourers, and even some young boys were forced to serve with the luggage carts. Thousands of children had been orphaned, and there had been no one to care for them. The weak had died, and those who did survive grew up wild, without any sense of family outside their gang of thugs, or loyalty beyond a petty bandit chieftain.

Novindus is home to the Pavillion of the Gods situated in the Ratn'Gary mountains. At the very peak of these mountains, unreachable by all but the greatest of mortals, lies the Celestial City, the home of the Gods.


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Pavilion of the Gods:

The Ratn'gary Mountains are the biggest mountains in Novindus, about three days up from Ratn'gary Gulf. Legend has it you'll find two things there: upon the two tallest peaks, the Pillars of Heaven - two mountains so tall no man has ever seen their peaks, stands the Celestial City, or so men say, the home of the gods. Below those peaks, in the foothills stands the Necropolis - the City of the Dead Gods, where all the gods who perished in the Chaos Wars wait.


City of the Dead Gods:

Against the mountains, a small city, the Necropolis, had been fashioned, and the plateau gave way to a plaza. A city it was, but a city unlike any other, for it was a city without markets, or stables, a city lacking taverns or even the rudest hut for a man to dwell within. In every direction one could travel, only tombs rose up. And upon each a single name was inscribed over the entrance. Some buildings were cut into the rock, while others were free-standing in the plaza. Their shapes were mind-numbing, with lines and curves that confounded the eye and nagged at the senses. Hexagons, pyramids, a pentagon, a rhomboid; Obelisks of improbable design, great upthrusting columns of jet and ivory inscribed with runic carvings stood at the four corners of the plaza. These were also oddly fashioned, with a curved face, then a flat one, or a defiant-looking three-sided tower next to a spiral.

The highest-placed temple, one that rests against the base of the mountains, honours the four lost gods. There you will find a tunnel into the heart of the Celestial Mountains. There lies the entrance to the Halls of the Dead. Those who built the temples are lost to history, but their works endure. Below the summit, above the Necropolis, lies a bastion. Within that dwell the Keepers.


Keepers of the Gate:

The Keepers of the Gate are men who belong to a sect that has almost no interaction with other men, not even with the recognized temples, but they are said to be custodians of the way to the gods. It is also said that if a man, driven by need, and committed in purpose, can find his way to the Keepers and, should he be deemed worthy, he will be permitted to petition the gods.


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Maharta:

Maharta, called the Queen City of the River.

A hundred years before the Darkwar, Maharta was the trading centre for the entire continent of Novindus. Everything going up or down river - from all the coastal cities, from Serpent River up to the distant Sulth - would pass through there.

The old Raj of Maharta's ancestors built the Great Temple Square so that merchants and travellers would have a place for their temples. The Raj's private army, the Royal Immortals, are an army of drug-induced maniacs, each man capable of feats of strength and bravery no sane man could achieve. The Immortals had been promised great glory and a better life when reborn if they died in the service of the Raj.

The shipbuilders at Maharta are the finest in Novindus. Only the shipwrights in the Pa'jkamaka Islands are their equal. The buildings near the wharves are of brick and mortar, not the flimsier, if cooler, constructions encountered farther north. The streets were cobbled and the sea breeze blew away much of the stench of overcrowding one endured in the City of the Serpent River. The city markets were prosperous, with well-fed, industrious people all around.


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Lanada:

Lanada, home of the Priest-King who was the cause of regional unrest twenty years before the Serpentwar, for he was involved in a three-way war with the Raj of Maharta and the Overlord of the City of the Serpent River.

During the Serpentwar, Lanada was fallen by treachery. No one was certain how, but someone had managed to convince the Priest-King to send his host north, leaving the city under the care of only a small company. The leader of that company had proved to be an agent for the Emerald Queen, and he had opened the gates of the city to a host of Saaur riding in from the southwest. The population had gone to sleep one night after a grand parade. The Priest-King's war elephants, with their razor-capped tusks and iron spikes ringing their legs, had lumbered out the gate, the howdahs on their backs filled with archers ready to rain death down on the invaders.

The next morning the city was in the hands of the Saaur and the populace awoke to the sounds of wailing as the invaders turned each household out, herding everyone, to the last man, woman, and child, to the central plaza, to hear the Priest-King. He had been marched out under guard and had informed the citizenry that they were now subject to the rule of the Emerald Queen. He and his cadre of priests were taken back into the palace and never heard from again.

The host of Lanada that had been sent north to face an army already behind them returned under orders from the Priest-King's General of the Army, who handed over command to General Fadawah, then joined his lord in the palace. Rumors flew through the city, ranging from the Priest-King, his ministers and generals being quickly executed to them being eaten by the Saaur.

One thing was clear, the conquest of Lanada was a certainty.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 11:38:58 AM by Alrin »
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2006, 08:57:17 AM »

Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
Gardell- A Blacksmith in Crydee during Pug's childhood.
Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
Lady Isashani, Lady of House Xacatecas of Tsuranuanni. Wife Of Chipino, Regent of House Xacatecas in Hoppara's youth.
Quote from: Dacilion
Malac's Cross - Kingdom town marking the boundary between the Western and the Eastern Realm (Principality of Krondor and Duchy of Salador), where stands a Dragon statue giving mental access to the Oracle of Aal.
[!--quoteo--][div class=\'quotetop\']QUOTE[/div][div class=\'quotemain\'][!--quotec--]Aal - The Lorekeepers of the Aal, the supposed first race. Born at the dawn of time, when the multitude of universes were still forming. The Oracle of Aal was considered the oldest being in the universe, ancient when the Valheru rose to challenge the gods during the Chaos Wars.[/quote]
Quote from: Alrin
aelebera - The plant, called Elleberry by Geoffrey, son of Caradoc, a monk at the Abbey of Silban, is also known to the people of the hills as Sparkle Thorn. It is purported to have magic properties when utilized correctly, though the proper means of distillation of the essences of the plant is not commonly known, being required of arcane ritual beyond the abilities of common folk. It is rare in the extreme, having been seen by few living today. The name Elleberry is a corruption of an elven word (aelebera)  that translates to ‘silverthorn’.
Quote from: Alrin
Navon du Sandau - Claimed to be a factor for several rich families and nobles, as well as an agent for trading concerns in the south and west. Was in actuality Neville of Cavell, leader of the Nighthawks in Kenting Rush.
[!--quoteo--][div class=\'quotetop\']QUOTE[/div][div class=\'quotemain\'][!--quotec--]Murmandamus:

Elven lore tells of the time when the last great battle in the north was fought, when the armies of the moredhel and their goblin servants at last crushed the glamredhel. The moredhel rampaged, obliterating their mad cousins in a terrible war of genocide. Even to the smallest infant, the glamredhel were supposedly slaughtered, lest they again rise and challenge the supremacy of the moredhel. It is the single blackest shame in the memory of the elven race that one segment of the people utterly destroyed another.

At the heart of the moredhel host stood a company called the Black Slayers, moredhel warriors who had renounced their mortality to become monsters with but one purpose: to kill for their master. Once dead, the Black Slayers rise again to do their master’s bidding. Once risen from the dead, they may be halted only by magic means, by utterly destroying the body, or cutting the hearts from out of their bodies.

Before the battle of obliteration, the moredhel had already gone far down the Dark Path, but something caused them to descend to these new depths of horror, the Black Slayers and the genocide. They had become a tool of an insane monster, a leader who sought to emulate the vanished Valheru and bring all the world under his dominion. It was he who had gathered the moredhel under his banner and who had given rise to the abomination that was the Black Slayers. But in that last battle he was wounded unto death, and with his passing the moredhel ceased to be a nation. His captains gathered and sought to determine a successor. They quickly fell out with one another and became much like the goblins - tribes, clans, families, never able to combine under one leader for long.

With his passing, an era of moredhel might came to an end. For he was unique, a charismatic, hypnotic being of strange abilities, able to weld the moredhel into a nation. The leader’s name was Murmandamus.[/quote]
« Last Edit: May 15, 2006, 04:34:49 PM by Alrin »
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 01:48:09 PM »

Quote from: Alrin
Ishap's Dawn - Ship given the task of transporting the Tear of the Gods to Krondor.
Quote from: coeshaw
Abdur Rachman Memo Hazara-Khan: Bey of the Benni-Sherin, Lord of the Jal-Pur, and Prince of the Empire, Ambassador of Great Kesh to the Kingdom of the Isles.
Quote from: Alrin
Natombi - Former Keshian Legionary who served with the Ninth Legion, on the Overn Deep. One of Calis's Desperate Men. Joined Erik and Roo's squad as a replacement for Billy Goodwin.
Spoiler: show
Died during the fall of Maharta.
- SoaDQ spoiler
Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
Incomo- Advisor to Jingu, Desio and Tasaio/Tasio of The Minwanabi.
Spoiler: show
Later serves mara when she defeats the minwanabi. dies in a decoy in order to protect mara and her quest. One of the most brilliant minds of the empire.
- Empire Trilogy spoilers
Quote from: coeshaw
Loranough - Keshian Port facing the Dragon Sea.
Quote from: Dacilion
Harulth - Six-legged Kelewanese beast of gigantic size used in the Games offered by Warlord Almecho to celebrate victory upon Kingdom armies.
Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
Hantukama- One of the 20 lesser Tsurani Gods. God Of Healing, priests renowned for healing abilities. They are indiscriminate and will heal a peasant over a ruling lord if they see it fit.
Quote from: coeshaw
Ironpass - Barony controlled by the King of the Kingdom of Isles, situated on the Teeth of the World range of mountains and protects the Kingdom from unwanted agressors from the north.
Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
Ayaki Acoma - Mara-Anni Acoma and Buntokapi Anasati's firstborn. Heir Apparent to house Acoma.
Spoiler: show
Killed on his birthday in a horse riding accident.
- Mistress Of The Empire Spoiler
« Last Edit: May 10, 2006, 03:15:42 PM by Alrin »
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 05:35:21 PM »

Rillanon:

A small island in the Sea of Kingdoms. It grew to engulf its neighboring island kingdoms, and it became the Kingdom of the Isles through Dannis, first conDoin King of Rillanon, some seven hundred fifty years before the Riftwar.

It is said that when the first King of the Isles built his fortress, he picked the highest peak on the island, and a series of wooden bridges protected his band of men - who were little more than pirates. Over the years the city has grown up from the docks and down from the palace, so that now you have this maze of streets and bridges.

Rillanon stands outlined against many hills, with several small rivers running down to the sea. It seems to be a city of bridges and canals, as much as towers and spires. A stunning creation of colored stone and graceful arches. A thing of marble and granite, Rillanon glimmers white and pink, yellow and amber, with hints of purple, green, red and blue scattered across the scene.

Not only is the city constructed of polished marble and granite, it is trimmed in all manner of ways: there are flower trellises, hillside gardens, colorful pennants and banners, and windows of quartz and glass. The late-afternoon sun sets the stones ablaze with reflected gold, amber, rose and white highlights.

The palace sits atop a hill, once the site of the large keep that still serves as its heart. Seven high-arched bridges span the river that surrounds the palace with the loops of its meandering course.

The Mad King, Rodric the Fourth, ordered the city rebuilt with every drab facade replaced by cut stone of brilliant hue. Kings Lyam, Patrick and Ryan continued with the project, and now nearly every building in the capital of the Kingdom of the Isles is a study in splendor.

The banner of Rillanon is a golden lion rampant holding a sword, with a crown above his head, upon a field of purple, the ancient crest of the conDoin kings.


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Salador:

Salador is an ancient city, sprawling and metropolitan. The outer districts are dominated by small local markets and streets of businesses, and the inner city bears little resemblance to the ancient walled fortress it must once have been in the dim past.

Krondor might be the capital of the Western Realm, but it is dwarfed in size by several of the eastern cities. Salador was the second largest city in the Kingdom after Rillanon. The Duke of Salador's home sits atop a hill, but over a mile from the harbor. A long, sloping hillside leads down into the heart of the city, and far beyond that lies the harbor.


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Rodez:

The court of Rodez is the easternmost duchy but one in the Kingdom. It is agreed that the finest blades in the world are made in foundry at Rodez.

In Rodez, when a man wrongs another man, a duel is fought. But when a family wrongs another family, a war is waged. It may be a quiet war, one that lasts for generations, but ultimately one family is destroyed.


-------


Krondor:

The capital city of the Western Realm of the Kingdom of the Isles was never silent. Krondor sprawled at the head of a large bay, beyond which an expanse of blue stretched off to the horizon: the Bitter Sea. The old city was walled, but an extensive foulburg - the part of the city outside the walls - had grown up over the years, until now it was much larger than the inner city. Inside the walls, the view was dominated by the palace of the Prince of Krondor, which sat atop a hill hard against the south side of the bay, having in ancient times been the defensive bastion of the Kingdom on the Bitter Sea.

The palace rises majestically atop a hill, a sprawling series of apartments and halls grafted around the original keep, which still served as the heart of the complex. Dwarfed by several other towers and spires added over the last few centuries, the old keep still commanded the eye, a brooding reminder of days gone by, when the world was a far more dangerous place. The royal docks were separated from the rest of the harbor by an area of open shoreline that was contained within the walls of the palace.

The Prince's court is the second busiest in the Kingdom, and only by a little after the King's. Effectively a separate realm, the West is governed from Krondor, with only broad policy coming from the King's court in Rillanon.


[div align=\"center\"]"This is the only home I've known, sewers or palace, thieves or nobles. Krondor is where I was born."[/div]
[div align=\"right\"] - James; Rage of a Demon King[/div]

The city is effectively ruled by two factions, the Prince's court and the Mockers. There are places in the city where even the Prince cannot reach, but no place in Krondor is beyond the Upright Man, the elusive leader the Guild of Thieves.

The Seal of Krondor is an eagle soaring over a peak above the sea.


-------


Sarth:

Sarth lay within the boundaries of the Principality of Krondor, which meant it had no local earl, baron, or duke to answer to, and to provide protection. Krondorian soldiers would ride a regular patrol from the boundary between the Principality and the Duchy of Yabon to the north to the city of Krondor itself. But for local problems, a militia, watch, or town constable would have primary responsibility to keep the peace until such a patrol arrived, or answered a request for help.

The town of Sarth was always a fairly busy one, with many fishing villages bringing their catch to market. It was also an important secondary port between Ylith and Krondor, one which many traders and not a few smugglers from the Free Cities or Queg visited. Kingdom customs had been more lax there, and as a result the city had quite a large population of people who were enterprising.

The southern edge of the town was hard against a cliff face, dropping down into a rocky beach where, even at low tide, there was no decent footing. The coast turned northwest after a while, and there Sarth's harbor could be found, with a long sandy beach and several fishing villages to the north.


The Abbey at Sarth:

The abbey at Sarth sat atop a high, craggy place, a small mountain rather than a hill, an upthrust thing of rock and granite facings, flat on top like a table.

In ancient times the fortress was home to a robber baron. The Kingdom and Kesh lay far enough away for him to be a law unto himself, pillaging, raping, and robbing without fear of retribution. After some time he was turned out by the people of the surrounding towns, made bold by his tyranny. The lands below the escarpment were given over to farming, but so deep was their hatred of the baron that the keep stood abandoned.

When a mendicant friar of our the Temple of Ishap's Order of Wanderers discovered the fortress, he sent word back to the temple in the city of Kesh. When the order sought the use of the place as an abbey, the descendants of those who had turned out the baron had no objection.


[div align=\"center\"]"I’d not want to attack up this road, Highness. You could hold it with six grandmothers wielding brooms ..."[/div]
[div align=\"right\"] - Gardan; Silverthorn[/div]

Tall, iron-banded heavy wooden gates straddled the roadway. To the right a stone wall a dozen feet high stretched away, appearing to run to the other edge of the mountaintop. To the left the wall receded, facing upon a vertical drop over a hundred feet to a switchback in the roadway below. Behind the wall there can be seen a single tower, several floors high.

The tower has been converted to an 'Observatory' to study the stars, planets, and moons, using clever devices built by some of the more talented artificers in the Kingdom and Kesh. Around the ancient tower a larger single-story keep building had been added, as well as two outbuildings that could be seen peeking from behind it, one a stable.

The hill upon which the Abbey rests is unlike those around it. It is mostly solid rock. When the first monks came to Sarth, they discovered tunnels and chambers underneath the keep. The original robber baron used these excavations as storage rooms, against siege, and to hoard booty. The Ishapian monks have added to them until the entire hill is honeycombed with vaults and passages.

Those who serve Ishap at Sarth gather together books, tomes, manuals, scrolls, and parchments, even fragments. In their order there is a saying: ‘Those at Sarth serve the god Knowledge,’ which is not far from the truth. Wherever one of the order finds a scrap of writing, it or a copy is eventually sent to the Abbey. In every chamber under the abbey are shelves. All are filled, even to the point of being crowded from floor to ceiling, and new vaults were constantly being dug. From the top of the hill to the lowest level there are over a thousand chambers. Each housed several hundred volumes or more. Some of the larger vaults hold several thousand.

For over three centuries the writings have been gathered. There are many of the order who do nothing but travel and buy any scrap they can find, or who pay to have copies made. Some are ancient, others are in languages unknown, and three are from another world, having been obtained from the Tsurani in LaMut. There are arcane works, auguries and manuals of power, hidden from the eyes of all but a few of the most highly placed in the order.


That Which Was Sarth:

Each Abbot at Sarth prepared against the time of great trial, that would see the abbey destroyed. Against that day the order prepared another place, to be called That Which Was Sarth. The arrival of Pug (or arguably Macros), the "One [who] would come, with companions, who knew the secret..." was the signal needed to begin moving the great library at Sarth to That Which Was Sarth, a location high in the mountains of Yabon. The order determined that the information contained within the abbey is too dangerous in the wrong hands. Therefore, only those within the order know the exact location of That Which Was Sarth.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 11:03:06 AM by Alrin »
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« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2006, 09:03:11 AM »

Northlands:

To most men of the Kingdom, ‘the Northlands’ was a convenient label for that unknown place the other side of the mountains, the nature of which could only be speculated upon.

To the north lie the High Ranges, all barriers against the denizens of the Northlands. In the west above Elvandar perch the Great Northern Mountains; in the east, the Northern Guardians, the High Fastness, and the Dreaming Mountains. And across the center lies the greatest range of all, the Teeth of the World, thirteen hundred miles of nearly impassable crags.


[div align=\"center\"]"Who knows what lies beyond? What man, save renegade or weapons runner,
has ventured there and returned to tell of the Northlands?"
[/div]
[div align=\"right\"]- Brother Micah; Silverthorn[/div]

To the northwest a vast plain stretched away into the distant mists, the Thunderhell. Few men of the Kingdom had ever trod upon that grassy domain, and then only with the consent of the nomads who called the Thunderhell home. At the eastern edge of the Thunderhell a range of hills rose, and beyond were lands never seen by men of the Kingdom.

Summer was quick to flee in the Northlands and the passes through the mountains known as the Teeth of the World. Autumn nights in the south might be soft and warm, but up in the north, autumn was a brief visitor and winter was early to arrive, and would be long in residence. Even in the spring and summer the nights are cold.

The Plain of Isbandia is cut across by the Vale of Isbandia. To the east is the Edder Forest, almost as vast as the Blackwood or the Green Heart. To the north beyond the vale is Sar-Sargoth, where legend has it, the Valheru met in council. Great circles of dragons rested there while their riders assembled.

The town of Raglam is sort of an open town. Not quite Kingdom, but enough humans living there that it’s not particularly Northlands, either. Lots of weapons runners, slavers and other no-accounts visit there all the time.


-------


Armengar:

Once called Sar-Isbandia, it was last called Armengar. It was built by the glamredhel, as was Sar-Sargoth, long before they fell into barbarism. Both were made in imitation of the city of Draken-Korin, using sciences plundered from other worlds. They were vain constructions, won by the moredhel in battle at great cost: first Sar-Sargoth, which became Murmandamus’s capital, then Sar-Isbandia. But Murmandamus was killed in the Battle of Sar-Isbandia, when the glamredhel were reputedly obliterated. Both cities were abandoned by the moredhel after his death. Moredhel returned to Sar-Sargoth for a time. Men lived in Armengar.

The city was separated from the walls by a bailey a hundred yards wide. Then began a tightly packed array of buildings, shot through with narrow streets. There was nothing like the broad boulevards of Krondor in sight, and no signs upon any building betraying its purpose.
The citadel seemed to grow from the very face of a gigantic cliff, against which the city was nestled. It rose up a full thirty stories high. Another wall, thirty feet in height, circled the citadel, and around the wall another moat.

The Armengarians were as honest and fine as you’ll find anywhere, in some ways, but they’re as alien as the Tsurani in other ways. Their poetry is limited to sagas of heroes, and their music is simple battle chants. They have no hereditary rank, instead placing great store in ability. When something needs to be decided, they call everyone into a meeting in the great square, where the market’s held. They call the meeting the volksraad, and they all vote. Otherwise, all decisions are left to those elected by the volksraad.

The highest 'rank' in Armengar is 'Protector of Armengar'. It’s like being named the King’s Marshal, but also something like being responsible for the safety of the city as well, a chief sheriff, constable, reeve, and bailiff all rolled up in one. The Protector is the most powerful person in the city, but even his power is limited to matters of safety for Armengar.


-------


Moraelin:

High in the Great Northern Mountains, in a rocky, barren place just below the crest lies Moraelin. It was once home to the dragonlord Alrin-Stolda, Monarch of the Black Lake. Moraelin is called Black Lake for a reason that has nothing to do with the color of the water. It is a well of madness. The moredhel hold it sacred and go there to dream dreams of power. It lies on the Dark Path, a place where no elf may go. The legend says a Prince of Elvandar walked the edge of Moraelin until he had worn a canyon around it, for he could not enter, nor would he leave until he had found that which would save his beloved. It is said he walks there still, wearing the ground down around the lake. This canyon is called the Tracks of the Hopeless. There lies the only way into Moraelin, across a bridge made by the moredhel.


-------


Northwarden:

The fortress at Northwarden is a towering keep of stone which dominates one of the three major passes through the eastern half of the Teeth of the World. Unlike Highcastle, which sits in the middle of the pass itself, providing a barrier that is a controlled gate, Northwarden rises up on a small peak, around which winds the pass known as Northland’s Door. A single road winds down the side of the large hill in a lazy s-curve, widening as it descends. Designed this way, the road gives the double benefit of allowing the Baron’s forces to spread out as they charge down to intercept any foe, while forcing any attackers to concentrate a smaller force in the van should they be foolish enough to attack up the road.

What keeps the road below in the Baron’s control is a series of siege engines mounted on two walls, the north and the west. The western defences are the heaviest, while the northern were designed to harry any forces attempting to come down the pass and negotiate the turn up the road to the keep. Mangonels and catapults, as well as a trio of heavy ballistae over the main gate, ensure that any army attempting to pass would take critical casualties before they rounded the pass and got beyond the engines’ range. Some soldiers would get past, it was certain, but nothing resembling an organized force. And to deal with any who did win through, the Baron keeps a small garrison of horse soldiers in a barracks near the small town of Dencamp-on-the-Teeth.


--------


Highcastle:

The largest of the Border Baron fortresses, in sits in the middle of the pass known as Cutter's Gap, providing a barrier that is a controlled gate, and was designed to withstand raids. The fortress had been built as a staging point for the garrison, with little thought that it would need to withstand a massive attack from an organized army.

Cutter’s Gap is at the south end of a wide valley, running through the Teeth of the World, rock-strewn and densely grown with brush for most of its length.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 09:58:20 AM by Alrin »
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« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2006, 10:51:20 AM »

Yabon:

When the Kingdom came to Yabon, the folk of the region were a loose association of clans, and were divided on their treatment of the Kingdom settlers. Some welcomed the Kingdom folk, some did not. For the most part, the Hadati kept to their old ways, living in the highlands and herding their sheep and cattle. But those in the towns quickly were absorbed as new settlers came in increasing numbers, until there was little difference between Yabon city men and those of the Kingdom. So Yabon became Kingdom.

But some resented the Kingdom, and resistance became open war. Kingdom soldiers came in numbers, and the rebellion was quickly crushed. But there is a story, not well believed, that some chose neither to bow before the King nor fight. Rather they chose to flee, going north to new homes beyond the control of the Kingdom.


Messenger Corps:

The traditional LaMutian uniform of the Messenger Corps was a round fur cap, flat on top, sporting a shining golden badge of the corps on one side. The forest-green jacket was cut at the waist, and bedecked with gold braid at the shoulders and sleeves, with six pairs of golden buttons down the front. The messengers wore tight-fitting gray riding trousers with a full leather seat, tucked into low riding boots of black leather. Each man carried a cavalry saber, and a belt knife, but little else. The rider would have a heavy coat he’d wear over the rig, once he was on the trail, but otherwise he carried only one ration of oats for his horse, and a water skin. Speed was the hallmark of the Messenger Corps. Only the finest riders in Yabon serve in the Duke’s Messenger Corps.


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Ylith:

A simple tower keep had dominated the harbor at Ylith for years, for the original rulers had been little more than pirates and traders and their harbor was everything. But after the Kingdom had annexed Yabon, the new Baron had decided to build this citadel at the north end of the city to protect the city from goblins and Brothers of the Dark Path from the Northlands, raiding down into Yabon. For five generations, until the serpentwar, the business of the Barony had been conducted in the citadel.


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Crydee:

A hundred years or more before the Riftwar, the Empire of Great Kesh was forced to strip its northern provinces of their legions and send them south to face the Keshian Confederacy, leaving the north open to the advances of the new, younger Kingdom. Since then all of what was once the old imperial province of Bosania, except for the Free Cities of Natal, has been called the Duchy of Crydee.

Situated at the mouth of the River Crydee on the shore of the Endless Sea, Castle Crydee is small in comparison to Krondor and other cities further east. There is an ancient keep, around which a single surrounding building has been erected, and later another hall was added to the rear.

Nicholas conDoin, youngest son of the King, took the keep from a Keshian garrison, and built the wall around it. His son built the two additional halls, leaving little further room for growth. Borric, the third Duke of Crydee, planned on pushing the wall out to accommodate new growth.

The castle was gutted in the sacking of the Far Coast, twenty-five years before the Serpentwar.

The woods to the northeast of the town of Crydee are less forbidding than the great forest to the south. Many years of harvesting trees for lumber has given the green glades a sunlit airiness not found in the deep haunts of the southern forest.

The banner of Crydee is a golden gull on brown.


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Carse:

The Barony of Carse is a vassal province to the Duchy of Crydee.

At the Battle of Carse Keep, when the castle was nearly taken by the Dark Brotherhood, the dwarves of Stone Mountain and the Grey Towers were on the march to aid the besieged. A messenger carried the news of the castle's imminent fall, and the dwarves ran for a day and a night and half a day again to fall on the Brotherhood from behind without any lessening of their fighting ability. The Brotherhood was broken, never again organizing under a single leader until the time of the Great Uprising.

The scarlet tabard of Carse is quartered by a gold cross, a golden griffin rampant.


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Bordon:

Bordon was a small city by Kingdom standards, little more than a seaport town, but far larger than Crydee. Like the other cities in the area, Bordon had no standing army, but instead supported a garrison of Natalese Rangers, descendants of the legendary Imperial Keshian Guides and counted among the best horse soldiers and trackers in the west. They could provide ample warning of approaching trouble and allow the local militia time to turn out. Nominally independent, the rangers were free to dispose of outlaws and renegades on the spot.

There is little love lost between the Free Cities and the Kingdom, and less still for the name conDoin. It was Nicholas conDoin, grandfather of Borric, who laid waste to Walinor and siege to Natal while attempting to conquer what had once been the Keshian province of Bosania. He was stopped only ten miles north of Bordon, and that memory still rankles many. Many in the Free Cities view the Duchy of Crydee as lands lost in that war. The population are Keshian by ancestry, but freemen by birth, and have little affection for conquerors.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2006, 06:22:05 PM by Alrin »
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« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2006, 09:00:53 PM »

Roldem:

Roldem is an ancient land, and is considered to be the seat of all things cultural and refined in the world. Fashion, literature, music, all flow from the court of Roldem.

The city contains a hive of shops clustered along each street, the press of people of all stripes - young, old, men and women, merchants, sailors, nobles and commoners. The scent of the sea can be found everywhere.

The Port of Roldem, harbor to the capital city, is one of the most crowded in the Sea of Kingdoms. Trade goods and passengers from the Empire of Great Kesh, the Kingdom of the Isles, and half a dozen lesser nations nearby come and go daily. Roldem is a busy port by any standard; not only are goods delivered there, but also transshipped, for Roldem is the trading capital of the Sea of Kingdoms.

The royal crest of Roldem is a dolphin leaping from a wave over a star.


The Masters' Court:

Over two hundred years before Talon of the Silver Hawk, the King of Roldem had commanded a tourney to name the greatest swordsman in the world. Nobles, commoners, soldiers and mercenaries had travelled from as far away as beyond the Girdle of Kesh - the mountains that separate the northern and southern halves of the Empire, the Far Coast of the Kingdom, and all points in between. The prize had been fabled: a broadsword fashioned from gold and studded with gems - an artefact worth a kingdom's taxes for years and years.

For two weeks the contest had continued until a local noble, a Count Versi Dango, had prevailed. To the King's astonished delight, he announced he would reject the prize, so that the King might make use of the value of the sword to pay for the construction of an academy dedicated to the blade, and there hold the contest on a regular basis: and thus the Masters' Court was born.

The King ordered the construction of the school which covered an entire city block in the heart of the island kingdom's capital, and over the years it had been rebuilt and refined, until now it resembled a palace as much as a school. Upon its completion, another tourney had been organized, and Count Dango had prevailed in defence of his rank as premier swordsman in the world.

Every fifth year the contest was held, until on his fourth defence, Count Dango was wounded in his match by the eventual winner and was forced to retire from the contest. Since then thirty-two different men have won the championship, with Talwin Hawkins the most recent.


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The Disputed Lands:

Olasko, Salmater, Miskalon, Roskalon, Maladon, Semrick, Far Lorin, and Aranor.

South of Olasko lie the lands controlled by the Lords of the Border, a group of duchies constantly at one another's throats: Miskalon, Ruskalon, the Duchy of Maladon and Simrick, Salmater and Far Lorin. The only successful conquest in the history of that sad region was when Maladon subdued Simrik two hundred years before the Darkwar. All contend over the Disputed Lands, and Olasko ensures that no one quite gets the upper hand.

To Olasko's west is the Principality of Aranor. Beyond Aranor is Far Lorin and Opast. Both have close ties with the Kingdom of the Isles, though both have warred with the Isles in the past.


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Olasko:

The southeastern corner of Olasko is a network of islands and waterways, with only one habitation of any size, the port city of Inaska. Hundreds of villages dot the thousand or more islands, which rest in what is in reality the mouth of the Anatak River. The rest of the islands are lush plantations of fruits, cotton and flax, intercut by glades full of exotic trees and animals, and a few hills high enough to encourage dry-land faming. But on the north shore of the river, above a small but thriving harbor, rested Opardum.

The city seems to be carved out of the face of the mountain, which is an illusion. From the sea, it looks as if a jumble of spirals and towers sprout out of the rock-face of a mountain thousands of feet in the air. The mountains are really a massive cliff, and at the top a relatively flat grassland ran downhill for a dozen miles to the west. There a series of fault lines cut canyons and crevasses across the entire region, making use of that land impossible to anything that couldn’t fly to reach it. Beyond that jumbled landscape lay vast grasslands and woodlands, still wild for the most part, until the city of Olasko Gateway was reached.

Compared to Rillanon, Roldem, Salador or even Krondor, Olasko has a small harbor. Behind it the city is relatively flat, then suddenly rises up on an incline, an almost evenly sloped face of soil and rock that has been terraced over the years and connected by ramps and streets. Then suddenly the citadel rises up behind, hard against the cliff-face, dug back deep into the rock.

The citadel is massive, rising ten stories above the foundations, surrounded by a wall of less than half that size. At the corners, towers rise up another twenty or so feet, so that overlapping archer fire can stop anyone coming up through the city to the citadel.

Olasko has two cultivated regions, the islands to the south, and the great rolling meadowlands and hills between Olasko Gateway and the border with the Principality of Aranor. Most of the land between Opardum and Olasko Gateway is forest and wild prairie, very dangerous to cross, so most commerce between the two cities is by the river.


The language of the region is similar to Roldemish, as settlers from that island had founded the various nations that comprised the Eastern Kingdoms. The exception being the Duchy of Maladon and Semrick, which had been settled by men from the Kingdom city of Ran. They spoke both the King’s Tongue and a local dialect of Roldemish.


Fortress of Despair:

The Fortress of Despair was an old keep, six stories tall, which overlooked the narrow passage between this island and the mainland, merely three miles away.

One of the first Dukes of Olasko built it. Then it was called Fortress Sentinel. When the City of the Guardian was built up, it sort of fell into disuse, until one of the old dukes decided to make a prison out of it.


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Bardac's Holdfast:

Bardac's Holdfast is hardly a nation at all. The original ruler, King Bardac the First, was a pirate with delusions of grandeur and his descendants are hardly any more than that. Most of the "nobility" of that land are robber barons and their King rules most effectively by leaving them alone.


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Latagore:

The city of Latagore rests upon the shore of an inlet, miles across, which gives it the appearance of having been set down by some giant hand in a crook of the shoreline.

The city has a wall around it, extending a hundred yards or more into the water. The citadel in the middle of the city rises high enough to overlook everything for miles. It was once a castle erected to defend the lake shore. The city grew up around it.


Kendrick's:

Kendrick's rises three storeys in the air and the roof is covered with stone tiles rather than thatch or wood. It is painted white, with wooden trim around the doors and windows, the shutters and doors having been painted a cheery green. Several chimneys stretch into the sky.

The inn sits in the centre of a natural clearing, but the stumps of a fair number of trees reveal that it has been enlarged over the years. The stumps are covered with grasses and brambles, but the road into the woods has been kept clear.

The walls are stout, and the forest on all sides had been cleared sufficiently to give archers on the wall a clear field of fire. The road from the woods turns abruptly halfway to the inn and circles around to gates on the other side of the inn. No ram or burning wagon caeasily be run along to destroy the iron banded gates and gain entrance. Archers in the upper windows can provide a second rank of defenders to support anyone on the wall. Murder-holes sit above each door. Hot oil or water, or arrows can be directed down at anyone in front of the door.


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Orosini:

The Orosini were a fair race, and brown hair was considered unusual. Conted fierce hunters, even trolls usually gave the villages of the Orosini a wide berth. Orosini cooking was done over open fires or in large communal ovens, but never in a central location. They could be an emotional people, given to loud celebration in times of joy and tears in times of sorrow. Open amongst themselves, talking about their thoughts and feelings easily, even with those not of the immediate family, they appeared stolid, even taciturn to outsiders.

The Orosini possess a strong sense of honour. When a man of the Orosini saves the life of another, the man who was saved was considered to be at the call of the other. It was as if he became a member of that family, but without the privileges of that membership. He was honour-bound to ensure that his saviour's family ate, even should his own go hungry. He was obliged to help bring in his saviour's crops before his own. In every way, the rescued man was in debt to the other.

Each Orosini boy endures his naming ritual upon the midsummer day close to the time of his birth anniversary in one of the many holy places scattered throughout the region. For years beyond numbering boys had climbed Shatana Higo, and men had returned.

The Orosini believe the world is a dream, fashioned by the gods, living in the mind of the Sleeper. People are part of that dream. But to men everything is real, because who can know what is real to a god?


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Orodon:

The Orodon are distant kin to the Orosini, though they are plainsmen and fishermen of the deep oceans, not mountain people. They have villages, but no cities, so each winter many of them journey south and in the early spring come here to the market in Latagore. There are traders who also put in at coastal villages up and down the land of the Orodon regularly.


Queala:

Queala was a large village, for it had thirty families living within its walls. There were four common buildings, the men's long house, the women's round house, a community kitchen, and a bathhouse. Smaller homes filled the stockade, with only a central clearing left empty.

The village had only two walls that could readily be attacked -- the south and the west, where the main gate was. The north wall overlooked a very steep hillside which should be impossible for a significant number of men to climb; two bowmen could easily sit up on the wall there and pick off any attackers foolish enough to try to come at the village that way. The east wall overlooked a gorge that fell away sixty feet below the base of the wall.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2006, 12:18:16 PM by Alrin »
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How Encyclopedia
« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2006, 01:22:42 PM »

Land's End:

Land’s End was an outpost, near the Keshian border. More accurately, it was the domain of the Lord of the Southern Marches, Duke Sutherland.

The first street facing the harbour was broad and cobbled, but the cobbles were worn nearly flat by hooves and iron-rimmed wheels and sledges; the bowsprits of a row of ships ran over it, above the heads of stevedores, sailors and passengers. Teamsters moved wagons close to receive offloaded cargo and quickly transport it to shops or warehouses nearby, and the usual assortment of riffraff lingered at the fringes. The dock-side street was hedged on its landward side by warehouses, two or three storeys high, with A-frame timbers jutting out from their gables to help hoist freight.

Beyond the warehouses, buildings rose up steep streets on the hills surrounding the harbour; they could get a few glimpses of the city walls, gates, and the pasture and forest beyond. Land’s End was still more of a large town than a small city, comprised of the usual gaggle of trades and workshops impractical or illegal inside a walled city, so no true foulbourg had been allowed to spring up outside the walls, but a thriving open market had been established beyond the clearing under the wall.


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Port Vykor:

Previously known as Shandon Bay, it was renamed Port Vykor during the Serpentwar in honour of the Admiral of the Eastern Fleet, Karole Vykor. Upon seeing the settlement, visitors speculate that had the first Prince of Krondor wandered a little farther south those many years ago, Shandon Bay would be the site for the capital of the Western Realm, not Krondor.

The harbor is commodious, opening into a calm bay that is relatively safe for shipping during the worst weather in the Bitter Sea. The docks can be extended as needed, for miles if necessary, and a broad highway to the northeast provides easy access from land. Half a decade after its founding, traders were making their way to the military encampment and businesses were springing up around the wooden stockade erected around the port. Within a score of years, what started as a temporary anchorage would become a city.


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Tomb of the Hopeless:

To the south of Shandon Bay lies an old caravan trail, no longer used. Further south of that trail lies a range of hills, in ancient times called the 'Valley of Lost Men,' to the east of which once rested an ancient Keshian fortress. The upper breastworks and towers have long since fallen, and all that remains are the underground tunnels. It is said the garrison had been left to die defending it.


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Vale of Dreams:

The Vale of Dreams is a lush series of rich farmlands, orchards, and villages benefiting from a seemingly endless series of streams that run from the Pillars of the Stars Mountains to the Great Star Lake. The region has been the object of conflict between the Kingdom of the Isles and the Empire of Great Kesh for over a century. Both sides maintain claims, and both sides send patrols into the Vale, but the Kingdom observe an unofficial accommodation with the Empire, and the Kingdom patrols do not venture too far south, and the Empire patrols do not wander too far north. As a result, the region has spawned a host of bandit gangs, mercenary companies, minor robber barons, and constant struggle. Finding a pillaged town or a burned-out village at any point is not unusual. If banditry gets too out of hand, one nation will look the other way while the other sends troops deep into the Vale to punish the malefactors.


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Stardock:

The Academy of Magicians dominated the island in the middle of the Great Star Lake, rising like a dark mountain. The village that rested at the academy's edge engulfed the entire northeastern end of the island. Only those who served in the academy lived there. No nation claimed dominion over the island or its town on the opposite shore. Patrols from the Kingdom garrison at Shamata would occasionally spend a day or two at the local inn, or Keshian patrols might ride up from the border fortress in Nar Ayab, but neither side claimed the Great Star Lake or the surrounding countryside. Once a duchy of the Kingdom, the island is now under the control of the Academy of Magicians and no one disputes their authority.

Stardock Town has grown around the ferry station to the island - at first just a simple trading stop, but now a bustling centre for commerce in the region. Compared to most farming communities, Stardock Town is wealthy, but even there a farmer's lot is not an easy one. The town is big enough to support a fair amount of commerce and a little bit of industry - there is a black­smith working ore brought down from the foothills - but most of the work is done by family members.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2006, 09:57:29 AM by Alrin »
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Re: How Encyclopedia
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2015, 08:38:27 PM »

This post is updated as the Riftwar Revisited thread carries on. The contents of this post are for inclusion into the Hall of Worlds Encyclopedia, as well as to help with the discussion in the Riftwar Revisited thread here on this forum.
Characters
  • Aglaranna, queen of the Elves and widow of king Aidan. She ruled her people in Elvandar and mourned the loss of her husband for twenty years. They had one son, prince Calin. She rode to Crydee to talk with Duke Borric, something that had never before happened in the Duke’s lifetime. (Magician: chapter 2,5)
  • Aidan, former king of the Elves, ex-husband of Aglaranna and father of prince Calin. He passed away six years before Pug’s birth due to a hunting accident. His death was considered untimely. He was considered a good and wise king. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Alfan, the pastry cook at Crydee’s Keep was a fat man and worked under Megar, the head cook. He was also known as Fat Alfan and had a tendency to lick the crumbs off his fingers while cooking, much to Megar’s dismay. He would still box Pug’s ears if justified regardless of his station. (Magician: chapter 1-2, 5)
  • Algon, the Duke’s Horsemaster at Castle Crydee. He taught pug to ride a horse in a week. (Magician: chapter 1, 3-5)
  • Althafain of Carse, a master magician and acquaintance of Kulgan, said to be a most puissant artificer of magic (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Arutha conDoin, second and youngest son of Borric and Catherine conDoin, Heir to the House of Crydee, Knight-Captain of the King’s Army of the West, Prince of the Royal House of Rillanon. He is four years older than Pug.  He was as tall as his brother and father, but rangy to the point of gauntness. His strength was in speed with the rapier and in wit. His hair was dark and his face clean-shaven. He was respected and admired for his abilities, but not warmly loved as his brother. Arutha admired Pug for his bravery to stand up against his bully. (Magician: chapter 2-5)
  • Borric conDoin, Third Duke of Crydee, Prince of the Kingdom; Lord of Crydee, Carse and Tulan; Warden of the West; Knight-General of the King’s Armies; heir presumptive to the throne of Rillanon.; widow of Catherine conDoin, father of Lyam, Arutha and Carline conDoin. The Third Duke of the Duchy of Crydee resided in the castle of the fortified city of Crydee. His bloodline descended from the King of the Kingdom of the Isles. He was renowed for his kindness. Borric was past his fifties with graying temples in his dark brown hair, yet looked younger than his age by twenty years. He wed his wife Catherine late in life. Borric went dressed in black after his wife died, when Pug was seven years old., and the only jewelry he wore was a ducal signet ring. He had robust humor, but could also have dark moods. He is shown to care greatly for his children, for example instructing Pug for hours on how to deal with riding with his daughter. He also rewards those that have served him, and places importance on the duty of honor and good manners. (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Calin, prince of the elves, son of queen Aglaranna and deceased king Aidan. He used to hunt together with Martin Longbow and his cousin Galain. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Captain Gregson, captain of the ship Green Deep from Margrave’s Port, who regularly visited Crydee. One of the Crydee town boys, Robert, chose to become a sailor under his command. The captain’s reputation was that of a good and fair man, the Third Duke of Crydee aware of his reputation and existence. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Carline conDoin, was the daughter of Borric and Catherine conDoin, sister of Lyam and Arutha. Princess and daughter of the royal house. She was a slim, graceful girl with nearly black hair and a beauty that made young boys fall in love with her, something she exploited to carry out mischief. She had a temper, and liked to go out and ride the countryside to have a picnic there. Her demeanor could be regal, but it was hinted her youth could be lonely too. She at first named Pug, “boy”, but after he saved her life, she defrosted towards him. (Magician: chapter 2-5)
  • Dick, the Duke’s stableman. His son was named Rulf. He looked the other way when his son sprang a trap on Pug. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Fanatha, a Great One, a magician from the world of Kelewan. The Warlord was one of his contacts. He was onboard a war galley when storm struck. He created the scroll Pug and Tomas found and attempted to move the war galley magically without a certain device. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Fannon, also known as Master Fannon or Swordmaster Fannon. He’s the Duke’s Swordmaster at Castle Crydee and trained Tomas as his apprentice. He has a lot of military knowledge and insight, advising Duke Borric conDoin on military related matters. He has a mustache. (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Fantus, a firedrake companion of Master Kulgan with emerald scales. This sentient being likes to be scratched behind the eyeridges and can feel insulted when offering this, but not being accommodated. (Magician: chapter 1, 3)
  • First Duke of Crydee, was the youngest son of the king of the Kingdom of the Isles. He lead an expedition army west to annex the province of Bosania from Great Kesh, which withdrew its armies to deal with the war against the Keshian Confederacy. He was the father of the Second Duke of Crydee, and grandfather of the third Duke of Crydee, Borric conDoin. (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Former Huntmaster of Borric conDoin, Third Duke of Crydee, he goes unnamed but took Martin Longbow as his apprentice and trained him. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Galain, cousin of prince Calin of the elves. They hunted together with Martin Longbow. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Gardan, is a Sergeant in the King’s Army and stationed at Crydee under the command of Swordmaster Fannon. Sergeant Gardan has a family. (Magician: chapter 3-5)
  • Garret, the last apprentice taken by Martin Longbow to serve in his company of trackers. He was a year older than Pug and Tomas. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Geoffry, apprentice to Housecarl Samuel at Crydee Keep. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Herald at the Court of Crydee, during the Choosing he heralded the Duke and his family by title and name, as well as the names of each present craftmaster. His own name is unknown. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Holm, Sailmaker and craftmaster at the Crydee court. During Pug and Tomas’ Choosing he chose three apprentices. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Jon, a young kitchen boy who at the Festival of Banapis guarded the patries with a shoo-fly. He failed to protect a pastry from being stolen by Tomas while Pug distracted him. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Kulgan of Crydee, advisor and master magician of the Duke of Crydee. His apprentice is Pug. He has a relationship with Meecham, which is why he spends time at his house in the woods. Kulgan is friends with Father Tully, but their debating can be fierce. Kulgan does not believe that there’s such a thing as lost arts in magic. Perceiving this as Ishapian dogma. He believes the nature of the universe is not to blame, but the teaching. Of a person. And therefore his failure to teach Pug is his own. He later orders Pug to teach himself to solve the question of Pug’s blockade with spellcasting. He is much surprised when he finds out Pug succeeded to cast a spell from his mind without help of an aid such as a scroll. (REF, Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Lyam conDoin, first and oldest son of Borric and Catherine conDoin, Heir to the House of Crydee, Knight-Captain of the King’s Army of the West, Prince of the Royal House of Rillanon. He is six years older than Pug.  Lyam was a powerfully built man. He had a closely-trimmed blonde beard as blonde as his shoulder-length hair. His open smile was the image of his mother’s and he always looked like he was on the verge of laughter. Lyam was openly loved by the Duke’s subjects. (Magician: chapter 2, 4-5)
  • Magya, the wife of Megar and mother of Tomas. She told Pug of his origin many times in the kitchen of the Castle's Keep. (Magician: chapter 1-2)
  • Marna, governess of Princess Carline. She was  also known as Lady Marna, suggesting nobility to a certain level. She groomed Carline to be beautiful to attract a powerful husband of important station one day. She was twice the size as a court lady, even twice the size of some guards and had a great bosom. She considered Pug a potential suitor after he became Squire. (Magician: chapter 2, 4-5)
  • Martin Longbow, the Duke’s Huntmaster and Forester was an orphan with dark eyes and dressed in forest green dyed leather attire. His skill with longbow was equalled by few, hence his last name. He was raised by the monks of Silban’s Abbey. First encountered by Pug and Tomas at the age of 26, he had been Huntmaster for four years and was described as a bit of a mystery. He was friendly and accessible towards boys while aloof towards adults. He had a seemingly unending patience. His duties consisted out of organizing hunts for the Duke, as well as track poachers, fire dangers, camping outlaws, migrating goblins, as well as lead a company of trackers of which apprentices were also part. His duties kept him away from Crydee for weeks at a time, and also out of the range of people who had not forgotten that Duke Borric himself placed young Martin in the care of his old Huntmaster, thereby breaking the rules of the Choosing. Martin since then became the object of ire, as the special treatment marked him as different and therefore as to be distrusted. Martin also spoke Elven, having grown up near the elven forest where he played with elven children and hunted with prince Calin and his cousin Galain. He was even invited to the End of Mourning feast of Queen Aglaranna, and showed emotional reaction when the old elven King’s name was spoken, indicating a certain degree of assimilation of certain Elven customs as his own, or at least respecting their believes as he stated so himself. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Meecham, a franklin with a yeoman’s bow. Pug concludes Meecham is serving Master Kulgan, unaware of Meecham’s relationship with Kulgan.. (REF, Magician: chapter 1,5)
  • Megar, husband of Magya and father of Tomas. He is the head cook at Crydee’s Keep. He was a loose-jointed man with sandy hair and an open countenance. He resembled Tomas like a rough sketch resembles the final drawing. He was a fair-looking man of middle years, but lacked Tomas fine features. (Magician: chapter 1-2,5)
  • Neala, one of the girls at Crydee’s Keep that Tomas has a crush on. Pug suspects the crush may be mutual. (Magician: chapter 3)
  • Old Whitebeard, an old stag with a fourteen point antler crown and a white muzzle that Pug and Tomas encounter. The stag has an understanding with Huntmaster Martin Longbow, signaling Martin’s closeness to nature. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Pug, Squire of Forest Deep, an orphan with sharp wit who was left with the Priests of Dala, who resides in a mountain Abbey, by a woman who claimed she found him in the road. Since the priests had no way to care for a baby let alone raise a child, they brought Pug to Crydee. There he was adopted by Megar, head cook of Duke Borric’s court, and his wife Magya. They raised him along with their son Tomas, who was Pug’s best friend and brother. Pug hoped to become apprentice to Swordmaster Fannon, but was not chosen. At the very last moment Master Kulgan offered him to become his apprentice to become a Magician, which Pug accepted. Pug is capable of calling forth an image when staring into a magic ball, a sign of his aptitude towards magic despite being untrained. As Kulgan’s apprentice, he quickly grasps the basic concepts, but feels blocked when spellcasting. He is then ordered by Kulgan to teach himself using the resources at his disposal as Kulgan’s apprentice. Pug had a crush on Princess Carline of Crydee. After saving her life by casting a spell from his mind, he was elevated to Squire and became part of Duke Borric’s Court. (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Prince of Krondor, visited Crydee when Pug was eight years old. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Robert, son of Hugen. He was a Crydee townboy and a netmender’s son. He had four older brothers, of which the eldest was married and with child, and he chose to be released from service with the Duke, seeing there was no more room for him at home and he could not resume learning the netmender’s craft, he chose  a life as sailor under Captain Gregson. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Rodric the Fourth, King of the Kingdom of the Isles. His reign started when Pug was three years old. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Roland, son of Baron Tolburt of Tulan – a vassal of the Duke of Crydee, and the squire at Duke Borric’s court. He was a companion to both conDoin princes in the Crydee court. He was sent to Crydee to learn of the Duchy management. He had an infectious sense of humour and ready wit, often accompanying princess Carline on her mischief. He stood tall for his age and had light brown hair with blue eyes. He was also friends with Tomas, and therefore by default with Pug. He was in love with Carline and became jealous of Pug when he attracted Carline’s affection. (Magician: chapter 2-5)
  • Rolendirk, a magician who discovered that the world of Midkemia was not flat, but round by placing his magical sight high enough to see the curvature of the world. (Magician: chapter 3)
  • Rulf, son of Dick, son of the Duke’s stableman. A pock-scarred bully that never got along with Pug and made his life miserable whenever he had the chance. He became an apprentice of Horsemaster Algon. Fourteen months later Pug and Rulf fought after Rulf insulted Pug and Pug struck him on the nose with his fist in return. The fight was broken up by Arutha conDoin. (Magician: chapter 2-3)
  • Samuel, Housecarl of the Duke of Crydee. He took as apprentice Geoffry. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Tolburt, Baron of Tulan and vassal of the Duke of Crydee.He has at least one son, Roland who was sent to Crydee. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Tomas, son of Megar the headcook and Magya his wife. He was a tall boy with sandy hair and bright blue eyes. He was liked in Crydee’s Keep due to his quick smile, in spite of his boyish tendency to find trouble. He was Pug’s closest friend and brother, as well as the unofficial leader of the boys that lived in Crydee’s Keep. He was fascinated by all things elven, and chosen as apprentice of Swordmaster Fannon. (Magician: chapter 2-5)
  • Tully, a priest of Astalon the Builder. Better known as Father Tully. He was advisor to both the Second as the Third Duke of Crydee. Although old of age, he was not senile. He had clear, grey eyes and a youthful wit and tongue. The white-haired priest sharp tongue was feared more than the Horsemaster’s whip. He was a strict master but a fair one. He had acolytes and used mind contact to learn more of Xomich before his death. He has extensive religious and historical knowledge, as well as good healing skills. (Magician: chapter 2-5)
  • Warlord, someone from Kelewan that Fanatha knew. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Xomich,, was a simple soldier from the nation Honshoni in the Empire of Tsuranuanni on the world of Kelewan. He was described as being short and stocky with powerfully muscled arms and legs. He was dressed in a bright blue armour, including a blue potlike helmet with outflaring edge on the sides and back. Below the breastplate he wore a short skirt of blue cloth. On his forearms were bracers, and on his legs, greaves that looked like leather, above thonged sandals. He had a strangely fashioned broadsword with serrated edges. He was the only member on the Tsuranuanni war galley send to Midkemia to survive, and his dreams were vital for Crydee to learn about the Tsuranuanni. (Magician: chapter 5)

Creatures
  • Kelewan
    • Six legged oxen that pull wagons. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Midkemia
    • Birds, such as undescribed singing birds, gulls, partridges and quails (Magician: chapter 2)
      • Sand squint, was a bird of notoriously foul habits. One of the things it did, was leaving its eggs in other bird nests, leaving its offspring to be raised by others.
    • Black forest boar, a kind of pig with two large tusks and bad tempered at best. They avoided humans if they could. (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Crabs (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Firedrakes, intelligent cousins to dragons no bigger than a small  hound with a long sinuous  neck atop an alligatorlike head. Its body is covered in scales, it has bony eye ridges, a long tail and red eyes. They breathe fire when hunting or feeling like it. May croon when rubbed above the eye ridges. (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Horses (Magician: chapter 1, 3-5)
    • Hounds (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Raccoons (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Rockclaws, a spiny creature living on beaches (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Sandcrawlers, a spiny creature living on beaches (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Sand lizards (Magician: chapter 1)
    • Stags (Magician: chapter 2)

Gods mentioned
  • Astalon, the Builder, The God Who Brought Order. Father Tully is his priest. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Dala, also named the Shield of the Weak. Her priests have a mountain abbey. (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Ishap, there is an Ishapian monastery. The Ishapians are considered to have some strange beliefs by other Priests, and they are an insular group, but they are also the oldest order kown. They are recognized as the senior church in questions pertaining to interdenominational differences. They are caretakers for the oldest lore and history in the Kingdom of the Isles. They have an extensive library at their temple in Krondor. (Magician: chapter 1, 3)
  • Long-vanished God of Magic, disappeared after or during the Chaos Wars. (Magician: chapter 3)

Geographical locations mentioned
  • Bitter Sea (Magician: chapter 1-2,5)
  • Carse, a city part of the Ducy of Crydee. It is part of the Kingdom of the Isles. Carse has its own keep. (Magician: chapter 1-2)
  • Castle Crydee (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Crydee, a city in the western part of Kingdom of the Isles, laying furthest from its capital (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Crydee’s Keep (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Duchy of Crydee, formerly the province of Bosania. It contains the cities of Crydee, Carse and Tulan. It’s capital is Crydee where the Duke resides. It is the most western province of the Kingdom of the Isles. (Magician: chapter 1-5)
  • Empire of Great Kesh, an Empire south of the Kingdom of the Isles. They once ruled territories now western part of the Kingdom of the Isles, such as Crydee. (Magician: chapter 1,5)
  • Empire of Tsuranuanni, an Empire on the world of Kelewan consisting out of many nations of which one is called Honshoni. A citizen of the Empire is called a Tsurani. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Elvandar, city of the elves ruled by queen Aglaranna (Magician: chapter 2,5)
  • Endless Sea, it’s so big that it’s named endless, although there are some theories that other nations exist across it. The Kingdom of the Isles has no ships capable of making a long journey across the Endless Sea. (Magician: chapter 1,5)
  • Free Cities of Natal (Magician: chapter 1-2,5)
  • Grey Tower Mountains, are situated east of Crydee and dwarves reside there. (Magician: chapter 1,5)
  • Honshoni, a hot land in the east of the Empire of Tsuranuanni. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Kelewan, the world on which the Empire of the Tsuranuanni exists. Its sun is larger and more green than the one of Midkemia. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Keshian Confederacy, a group of small nations who had existed as tributaries to Great Kesh for centuries before uniting against their oppressor the Empire of Great Kesh. (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Kingdom of the Isles, also known as ´the Kingdom´ with as capital city Rillanon. (Magician: chapter 1-2)
  • Kingdom Sea, the sea on the east side of the Kingdom of the Isles. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Krondor, a Kingdom of the Isles city with an Ishapian temple. (Magician: chapter 3)
  • Margrave’s Port, one of the Free Cities of Natal on the northern coast of the Bitter Sea. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Midkemia, the world which has the Kingdom of the Isles, Empire of Kesh, Keshian Confederacy, Queg, Free Cities of Natal and Roldem on them. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Northlands, in the north where the goblins and Brotherhood of the Dark Path dwell. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Queg, they trade with Crydee by sea, (Magician: chapter 1,5)
  • Rillanon, capital city of the Kingdom of the Isles. The court of the King resides here. (Magician: chapter 1, 5)
  • Salador, a city in the Kingdom of the Isles. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Stone Mountain, a mountain north of Crydee where dwarves reside. (Magician: chapter 2, 5)
  • Tulan, a city part of the Duchy of Crydee. It is part of the Kingdom of the Isles and governed by a vassal of the Duke of Crydee, a baron. During the reign of the Third Duke of Crydee, the baron of the town of Tulan was Baron Tolburt. (Magician: chapter 2, 4)
  • Yankora, a city in the Empire of Tsuranuanni. The city Xomich last visited before his departure to Midkemia. (Magician: chapter 5)

Geographical locations mentioned but not found on the in-book map
  • Abbey of Sarth, an abbey near the city of Sarth, which has a library ten times bigger than the one of the Ishapian temple in Krondor. (Magician: chapter 3)
  • Assembly, the Assembly lies somewhere on Kelewan. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Bosania, old province of the Empire of Great Kesh, now split up as the Western Realm of the Kingdom of the Isles and the Free Cities of Natal (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Forest Deep, an estate part of the territory of the Kingdom of the Isles and governed by the Duke of Crydee. It is given to Pug when he was elevated to the station of Squire. (Magician: chapter 4)
  • Forest of Crydee, appears to consist out of a lightly forested part near Crydee due to lumbering and a more thickly forested part further south of  town. (Magician: chapter 1-2)
  • King’s road, (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Sailor’s Grief, a rocky pinnacle south of Crydee. It’s notorious for causing shipwrecks and a site for suicide. (Magician: chapter 1,2,5)
  • Silban’s Abbey, a monastery near the elven woods of Elvandar. Martin Longbow was raised there. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Six Sisters, six small islands before the coast of Crydee (Magician: chapter 1)
  • Zacara, a city in the Empire of Great Kesh (Magician: chapter 1)

Races
  • Kelewan
    • Humans, have a complex society that consists as various nations within one empire: the Empire of Tsuranuanni. (Magician: chapter 5)
    • Thûn, centaur like creatures. (Magician: chapter 5)
    • Unknown races, that look like insects or reptiles but speak like men. (Magician: chapter 5)
  • Midkemia
    • Dwarves, some live at Stone Mountain, trading with Crydee, selling their ale to Crydee. Others live at the Grey Towers. (Magician: chapter 2,5)
    • Elves
      • Elves at Elvandar, they were ruled by Queen Aglaranna alone after the death of King Aidan. (Magician: chapter 2,5)
      • Brotherhood of the Dark Path, attacked Crydee with the goblins when Pug was five years old. (Magician: chapter 2,5)
    • Goblins, they live in tribes in the Northlands. They attacked Crydee together with the Brotherhood of the Dark Path when Pug was five years old. (Magician: chapter 2,5)
    • Humans, they live everywhere on Midkemia. They have complex societies in which they live, such as Kingdoms or Empires. Examples are: Kingdom of the Isles, Roldem, Queg, Free Cities of Natal, Keshian Empire, and the Keshian Confederacy. (Magician: chapter 1-2)
    • Trolls, were humanlike, but short and broad, with long, thick arms that hung nearly to the ground. They ran on all fours as often as not, looking like some comic parody of an ape, their bodies covered by thick grey hide and their lips drawn back, revealing long fangs. Trolls usually didn’t venture this far from the forest, and rarely troubled a group of humans, but they would attack lone travelers from time to time. They stank of rotten meat.(Magician: chapter 4)



Cultural customs, traditions and rituals
  • Death and dying in Elven culture, the mourning for a partner lasts twenty years. The end of mourning is celebrated with a feast. The names of the deceased are no longer spoken, especially not of those who went untimely, because they believe that doing so recalls those spoken of from their journey to the Blessed Isles (afterlife). Thereby denying them their final rest. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Elevation to the station of Squire, can be proclaimed by a Duke in attendance of his court, minor nobles and master craftsmen and merchants. An estate is assigned to the Squire, if they are eighteen years or older. Before that the property is in the hands of the Kingdom. (Magician: chapter 4)
  • Midsummer’s day and the Fesitval of Banapis, the day that ended one year and signaled the start of another. On this day everyone would become one year older. Upon Midsummer’s day the Festival of Banapis is celebrated. This ancient celebration is rumoured to be celebrated not only among men, but also among elves, dwarves and other races, such as goblins or the brother hood of the dark path. Although no man has ever witnessed this. At the festival the nobility mingled with the commoner as there was no rank, ceremony and ritual. Each was served as he or she arrived, as equals, and equally sharing in the bounties of harvest. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • Midkemian Week, the week consists of six days, named from Firstday to Sixthday. The afternoon of the sixthday was an afternoon off for the boys and girls living at Crydee’s keep. The masters take the day off at Firstday, a day where only the necessities are done such as putting food on the table for that day. (Magician: chapter 3)
  • Sailors, owed their loyalty to the city that was their home port. (Magician: chapter 2)
  • The Choosing, is one of the oldest traditions, its origin lost in time, and taking place at Midsummer’s day. Between the age of 8 and 13, the boys work in various crafts. The craftmasters then discuss with the Duke’s staff the merits of each boy, deciding which boy should become an apprentice The crafstmasters pick new apprentices from the freshly turned fourteen year olds. Although Magya described it as an excuse to sit around, smoke pipes, drink ale and swap tales since the choices were already known. Which was true, as the Duke’s staff and assembled craftmasters had already spend hours discussing each boys merits before the start of the Choosing. Both keep as town boys from Crydee are part of the ritual under the watchful eye of the Duke of Crydee and his family. If a man was not chosen, he was free to leave Crydee to find a craft in another town or city. To stay would mean work the Duke’s land as a franklin or on one of the town’s fishing boats. At the start of the Choosing, the boys would line up. Then the craftmasters would line up before them, but with their backs turned towards the boys. The Duke and his family would enter, each heralded upon entry. Then the craftmasters would turn and the Duke would ask who wanted to be released of service. After this, the choosing would commence. Each craftmaster would select an apprentice, and the remaining unselected would be dismissed by the Duke, to live as freemen. (Magician: chapter 1-2)

Symbols and the like
  • House of Borric conDoin, Third Duke of Crydee, his colours are brown with gold. Each tabard  was emblazoned with the golden gull of Crydee, with above that a small golden crown to mark the Duke as member of the Royal Family.
  • Emblem of Horsemaster Algon at Crydee Court, a small horsehead embroidered over the left breast of his gold and brown tabard.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2015, 04:08:05 PM by Darkon »
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