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Author Topic: Loss to the Genre  (Read 16189 times)

The Wolf

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Loss to the Genre
« on: January 17, 2005, 12:14:17 AM »

I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread where we could keep track of losses of sci-fi and fantasy news worthy people. We'll see how it goes.  :smile:
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The Wolf

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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2005, 12:14:49 AM »

Bollywood actor Amrish Puri (b.1932) died of a brain hemorrhage on January 12. Puri is best known to Western audiences for his role as the evil Mola Ram in “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.” Most of his more than 200 films were made in India, beginning in 1971 with “Reshma Aur Shera.” At the time of his death, he was working on the film “Mumbai Express.”
« Last Edit: January 22, 2005, 06:57:26 AM by The Wolf »
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The Wolf

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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2005, 12:18:38 AM »

Humphrey Carpenter (b.1946) died on January 4. Carpenter was a scholar who wrote J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography in 1977. Carpenter was given complete access to Tolkien's papers as well as interviews with family and friends.
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Miranda

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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2005, 08:55:53 AM »

Wolf, this is a good idea.


Lets hope it doesn't get filled too quickly...
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Myddrun

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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2005, 09:13:08 AM »

A mention must go to Douglas Adams who passed away in May 2001 at the age of 49.

In over 50 years of the Hugos (the highest awards in science fiction, voted for each year by the members of the World Science Fiction Convention), Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (HHGG) is the only radio show ever to be nominated.

In December 1982 Douglas had three books in both the New York Times bestseller list and the Publishers' Weekly bestseller list - the first British author to have achieved this since Ian Fleming.

In 1996, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was placed at number 24 in the Waterstone’s Books/Channel Four list of the One Hundred Greatest Books of the Century.

(edited to make it shorter *grin*)
« Last Edit: January 18, 2005, 01:06:54 PM by Myddrun »
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The Wolf

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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2005, 12:41:19 PM »

Very good Myddrun, but let's keep this thread for recent obits :smile:
« Last Edit: January 18, 2005, 12:43:11 PM by The Wolf »
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dreeken

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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2005, 04:13:31 PM »

Well Wolf I think this topic deserves a pin, it should be glued to the top of the  General Fantasy & Sci-Fi, what do you think?


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Shifty

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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2005, 05:52:53 PM »

I would agree. Definitely a good idea for a thread, elbeit a sad one.

The Wolf

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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2005, 11:47:18 PM »

I concur, move it , pin it...jump down turn around....wait wrong issue...cool  :smile:
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The Wolf

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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2005, 02:47:33 AM »

The Loss of a Great Artist: Frank Kelly Freas (1922–2005)

By David A. Hardy. Frank Kelly Freas passed away in his sleep at his home in California in the early hours of Sunday, 2nd January, at the age of 84. He had not been in the best of health for some time, but even so his death will come as a shock to his many fans.

He leaves behind his wife of 16 years, Laura Brodian Freas, a daughter, son and six grandchildren. He was a graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.

Sadly, I never had a chance to meet Kelly myself, but I did have the pleasure of corresponding with him in 1979 when I was working on ‘Visions Of Space’ (Dragon’s World, 1989) and he seemed a real gentleman, always helpful and, amazingly, he seemed honoured to be included in this book about space art. But he was, of course, a space artist among his other talents and was one of the first artists to be awarded a Fellowship by the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA) in 2000.

After visiting Cape Canaveral, he produced a series of posters promoting the Apollo programme with titles like “We (still) have a choice?” and “Er – suppose Isabella had said ‘NO’!” because he was appalled by the cutbacks at NASA and he firmly believed that mankind’s destiny lies in space. He also designed astronauts’ crew patches, including Skylab, and his work is in the National Air & Space Museum and in other galleries.

Kelly is, however, even better known in the fields of SF and comic art. He started drawing Buck Rogers spaceships in kindergarten at the age of seven or eight and later admired the SF work of Virgil Finlay and Ed Cartier, but also the astronomical art of Chesley Bonestell. His own first professional work was in ‘Weird Tales’ November 1950 and he went on to produce covers for most of the major publishers – Daw, Ace, Lancer, et al – and famous writers, including Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Van Vogt, Pohl and Anderson. He has won the Hugo Award for ‘Best Artist’ 11 times! He gave us sleek spaceships, humanoid robots, entertaining aliens, weird landscapes and (lots of!) exotic women.

Kelly has said that he considered himself to be mainly an illustrator, but he was also a fine artist and portraitist and his work is avidly collected. He also worked on TV backgrounds, commercials and animations. One of Kelly’s best-known – one might even say iconic – images was a cover for a 1953 Astounding magazine, illustrating a story by Tom Godwin: ‘The Gulf Between’.

This showed a giant robot holding a bloodied, dead man in his hand; in 1977 he was asked to re-paint this as the cover for the ‘News of the World’ album by the rock group Queen, incorporating members of the band. Also well-known is his green ‘Martian’ leaning through a keyhole, originally done for Fredric Brown’s ‘Martians, Go Home’, but later used as the cover of a collection of his work entitled ‘The Art of Science Fiction’ (Donning, 1977). A more recent (and better) collection is ‘As He Sees It’ (Paper Tiger, 2000).

Another string to Kelly’s bow was comic art. During the 1950s, he worked on ‘Mad’ magazine, for which he was the chief cover artist. He produced many brilliant portraits, and helped to make the Alfred E. Neuman character world-famous with his freckles, gap-toothed grin and the phrase, ‘What? Me Worry?’ In all of these fields his style influenced two generations of artists and designers and he will be much missed. Fortunately, he will live on through his art.

David A. Hardy

January 2004
« Last Edit: January 22, 2005, 07:01:18 AM by The Wolf »
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Myddrun

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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2005, 09:29:29 AM »

Andre Norton 1912-2005

<Must say this was quoted from the web sitem, Unforuntatly I haven't knowingly read any of her stories. But I'm going to look for them. Found out in the most recent copy of Dragon  (D&Dmagazine)>

Say the name to someone who's read her, and watch the flash in their eyes. There's something about Andre Norton. She calls herself an old-fashioned storyteller and, indeed, whether it's fantasy, science fiction, adventure, romance or any other genre of popular literature, she manages to capture the audience's attention in the gracious style of the long-gone bardic masters. This quality, acknowledged by both the readers and critics has given her the title of the Grand Dame of Science Fiction and Fantasy.
 
She's often classified as a writer for young adults, but maybe that should be restated as for the "young-at-heart". Anyone, either gender, or any age, who enjoys great, emotional stories will find at least one segment of her enormous range of writing to treasure.

But there's something beyond skillful plots and incredibly imaginative settings. Something intangible that fuses her writing into the pillars and archways of your soul. The Lady, as her fans call her, reaches the hearts of people like no one else.

Most readers are in their teens when they first find her. And for those that do, it's like falling through a secret door into a universe of other worlds. Wild, beautiful worlds where being different is no crime, and great, courageous hearts overcome their own fears and prove stronger than evil, and find a place.
 
It has been said that science fiction is primarily philosophy, expounding the right to be different. Nowhere is that truer than in Ms. Norton's writing, where protagonists of many ethnicities have shown their intelligence and valor, and the value of all living things is affirmed.

The critics weren't quick to support her. But eventually they began to notice the consistent quality of her work. Today she is one of SF-F's most lauded female authors, the first woman to receive the Gandalf Grand Master of Fantasy and the Nebula Grand Master Award.

Her success paved the way for other women to write in those fields. Writers such as C.J. Cherryh, Anne McCaffrey and Mercedes Lackey are inheritors of Andre Norton's legacy.

Although her work has encompassed many genres, Andre Norton is probably most famous for her fantasy, in particular the Witch World series, begun in 1963 with the Hugo-nominated book of the same name. The popularity of the Witch World series has been so great that Ms. Norton continued it, to please her readers, to an incredible 35 books.

---------------------

The Andre Norton web site.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2005, 04:38:13 PM by Myddrun »
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Val

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« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2005, 05:38:20 PM »

Andre Norton? Oh yeah, heard about her at least, but have never read anything by her. All I know is that she had quite a popularity, so well, definitely a loss to the genre. But, 93 years is quite an old age...
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Shifty

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« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2005, 07:24:40 PM »

James Doohan, AKA Montgomery Scott, chief engineer on the original Star Trek, died today from Pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer's at age 85.

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« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2005, 11:30:10 PM »

A sad day, more on "Scotty" from Bob Thomas, AP


'Star Trek' Star James Doohan Dies
By BOB THOMAS, AP

   
James Doohan will always be known for his role of Scotty on 'Star Trek.'


Talk About It: Post Thoughts  
   
LOS ANGELES (July 20) - James Doohan, the burly chief engineer of the Starship Enterprise in the original "Star Trek" TV series and motion pictures who responded to the command "Beam me up, Scotty," died early Wednesday. He was 85.

Doohan died at 5:30 a.m. at his Redmond, Wash., home with his wife of 28 years, Wende, at his side, Los Angeles agent and longtime friend Steve Stevens said. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, he said.

The Canadian-born Doohan was enjoying a busy career as a character actor when he auditioned for a role as an engineer in a new space adventure on NBC in 1966. A master of dialects from his early years in radio, he tried seven different accents.

"The producers asked me which one I preferred," Doohan recalled 30 years later. "I believed the Scot voice was the most commanding. So I told them, 'If this character is going to be an engineer, you'd better make him a Scotsman."'

The series, which starred William Shatner as Capt. James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as the enigmatic Mr. Spock, attracted an enthusiastic following of science fiction fans, especially among teenagers and children, but not enough ratings power. NBC canceled it after three seasons.

When the series ended in 1969, Doohan found himself typecast as Montgomery Scott, the canny engineer with a burr in his voice. In 1973, he complained to his dentist, who advised him: "Jimmy, you're going to be Scotty long after you're dead. If I were you, I'd go with the flow."

"I took his advice," said Doohan, "and since then everything's been just lovely."

"Star Trek" continued in syndicated TV both in the United States and abroad, and its following grew larger and more dedicated. In his later years, Doohan attended 40 "Trekkie" gatherings around the country and lectured at colleges.

The huge success of George Lucas's "Star Wars" in 1977 prompted Paramount Pictures, which had produced "Star Trek" for TV, to plan a movie based on the series. The studio brought back the TV cast and hired a topflight director, Robert Wise. "Star Trek - The Motion Picture" was successful enough to spawn five sequels.

The powerfully built Doohan, a veteran of D-Day in Normandy, spoke frankly in 1998 about his employer, Paramount, and his TV commander:

"I started out in the series at basic minimum- plus 10 percent for my agent. That was added a little bit in the second year. When we finally got to our third year, Paramount told us we'd get second-year pay! That's how much they loved us."

   
 Scotty Remembered  
   
   
   
   
He accused Shatner of hogging the camera, adding: "I like Captain Kirk, but I sure don't like Bill. He's so insecure that all he can think about is himself."

James Montgomery Doohan was born March 3, 1920, in Vancouver, B.C., youngest of four children of William Doohan, a pharmacist, veterinarian and dentist, and his wife Sarah. As he wrote in his autobiography, "Beam Me Up, Scotty," his father was a drunk who made life miserable for his wife and children.

At 19, James escaped the turmoil at home by joining the Canadian army, becoming a lieutenant in artillery. He was among the Canadian forces that landed on Juno Beach on D-Day. "The sea was rough," he recalled. "We were more afraid of drowning than the Germans."

The Canadians crossed a minefield laid for tanks; the soldiers weren't heavy enough to detonate the bombs. At 11:30 that night, he was machine-gunned, taking six hits: one that took off his middle right finger (he managed to hide the missing finger on the screen), four in his leg and one in the chest. Fortunately the chest bullet was stopped by his silver cigarette case.

After the war Doohan on a whim enrolled in a drama class in Toronto. He showed promise and won a two-year scholarship to New York's famed Neighborhood Playhouse, where fellow students included Leslie Nielsen, Tony Randall and Richard Boone.

His commanding presence and booming voice brought him work as a character actor in films and television, both in Canada and the U.S. Oddly, his only other TV series besides "Star Trek" was another space adventure, "Space Command," in 1953.

Doohan's first marriage to Judy Doohan produced four children. He had two children by his second marriage to Anita Yagel. Both marriages ended in divorce. In 1974 he married Wende Braunberger, and their children were Eric, Thomas and Sarah, who was born in 2000, when Doohan was 80.

In a 1998 interview, Doohan was asked if he ever got tired of hearing the line "Beam me up, Scotty."

"I'm not tired of it at all," he replied. "Good gracious, it's been said to me for just about 31 years. It's been said to me at 70 miles an hour across four lanes on the freeway. I hear it from just about everybody. It's been fun."

Funeral arrangements were incomplete.


07/20/05 11:54 EDT

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.
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Shifty

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« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2005, 04:50:40 AM »

Woah, I had no idea he was at Juno. Man, he's just earned quite a few notches of respect from me.

Lady Mara of the Acoma

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« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2005, 02:30:37 AM »

[span style=\'color:beige\']Since the subject has been launched, let us remember dear Richard Harris a whole actor.
Born: 1 October 1930
Limerick, Ireland
Died :25 October 2002
London, England, UK. (hodgkin's disease)

He played in fantasy films like "Camelot", (musical) "Robin and marian", "Gulliver's travels", many Shakespearean tragedies and of course "Harry Potter", more recently !

A sad thing  all this and we'll all go through it !
We miss you Richard !

Mara, not too valiant ![/span]
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coeshaw

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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2005, 11:34:49 AM »

following on from the death of Scotty the BBC have an article about how his ashes are being sent into space.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/t...dio/4344384.stm
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coeshaw

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« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2005, 01:40:32 AM »

Michael Piller the co-creater of Star Trek DS9 and writer / producer on many other Star Trek series & Films has died of cancer at the age of 57. To read more about this sad loss  go here.
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« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2005, 10:44:25 PM »

Keith Parkinson passed away on Oct 26, 2005.  If you haven't heard of him then you've never looked at many of the art covers of the books we read, the original TSR D&D illustrations, or played Everquest (which was designed around his art).

Info:  http://www.darkswordminiatures.com/
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Myddrun

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« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2006, 03:42:20 PM »


I know its late but I just found out that Jack Chalker died last year.  

It's a shame. I love the Well World novels he wrote.

Since 1978 he made his living solely by writing and published over 60 science fiction or fantasy novels and anthologies. During their years of publication, Jack wrote a regular column on SF/fantasy small press for Fantasy Review and continued the column on an irregular basis in Pulphouse magazine.

A long time science fiction fan, he attended hundreds of conventions. As a SF professional, he stayed very accessible to fans. He was Toastmaster at the 1983 WorldCon, and co-chaired the 1974 WorldCon, Discon II. He was a 3-term treasurer of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).

His awards included the Dedalus Award (1983), The Gold Medal of the West Coast Review of Books (1984), Skylark Award (1985), and Hamilton-Brackett Memorial Award (1979).
« Last Edit: February 08, 2006, 03:42:53 PM by Myddrun »
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