Honest Johns

The Hall of Fantasy & Science Fiction => General Fantasy & Science Fiction => Topic started by: The Wolf on January 17, 2005, 12:14:17 AM

Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 17, 2005, 12:14:17 AM
I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread where we could keep track of losses of sci-fi and fantasy news worthy people. We'll see how it goes.  :smile:
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 17, 2005, 12:14:49 AM
Bollywood actor Amrish Puri (b.1932) died of a brain hemorrhage on January 12. Puri is best known to Western audiences for his role as the evil Mola Ram in “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.” Most of his more than 200 films were made in India, beginning in 1971 with “Reshma Aur Shera.” At the time of his death, he was working on the film “Mumbai Express.”
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 17, 2005, 12:18:38 AM
Humphrey Carpenter (b.1946) died on January 4. Carpenter was a scholar who wrote J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography in 1977. Carpenter was given complete access to Tolkien's papers as well as interviews with family and friends.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Miranda on January 18, 2005, 08:55:53 AM
Wolf, this is a good idea.


Lets hope it doesn't get filled too quickly...
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on January 18, 2005, 09:13:08 AM
A mention must go to Douglas Adams who passed away in May 2001 at the age of 49.

In over 50 years of the Hugos (the highest awards in science fiction, voted for each year by the members of the World Science Fiction Convention), Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (HHGG) is the only radio show ever to be nominated.

In December 1982 Douglas had three books in both the New York Times bestseller list and the Publishers' Weekly bestseller list - the first British author to have achieved this since Ian Fleming.

In 1996, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was placed at number 24 in the Waterstone’s Books/Channel Four list of the One Hundred Greatest Books of the Century.

(edited to make it shorter *grin*)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 18, 2005, 12:41:19 PM
Very good Myddrun, but let's keep this thread for recent obits :smile:
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: dreeken on January 18, 2005, 04:13:31 PM
Well Wolf I think this topic deserves a pin, it should be glued to the top of the  General Fantasy & Sci-Fi, what do you think?


Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Shifty on January 18, 2005, 05:52:53 PM
I would agree. Definitely a good idea for a thread, elbeit a sad one.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 18, 2005, 11:47:18 PM
I concur, move it , pin it...jump down turn around....wait wrong issue...cool  :smile:
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on January 19, 2005, 02:47:33 AM
The Loss of a Great Artist: Frank Kelly Freas (1922–2005)

By David A. Hardy. Frank Kelly Freas passed away in his sleep at his home in California in the early hours of Sunday, 2nd January, at the age of 84. He had not been in the best of health for some time, but even so his death will come as a shock to his many fans.

He leaves behind his wife of 16 years, Laura Brodian Freas, a daughter, son and six grandchildren. He was a graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.

Sadly, I never had a chance to meet Kelly myself, but I did have the pleasure of corresponding with him in 1979 when I was working on ‘Visions Of Space’ (Dragon’s World, 1989) and he seemed a real gentleman, always helpful and, amazingly, he seemed honoured to be included in this book about space art. But he was, of course, a space artist among his other talents and was one of the first artists to be awarded a Fellowship by the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA) in 2000.

After visiting Cape Canaveral, he produced a series of posters promoting the Apollo programme with titles like “We (still) have a choice?” and “Er – suppose Isabella had said ‘NO’!” because he was appalled by the cutbacks at NASA and he firmly believed that mankind’s destiny lies in space. He also designed astronauts’ crew patches, including Skylab, and his work is in the National Air & Space Museum and in other galleries.

Kelly is, however, even better known in the fields of SF and comic art. He started drawing Buck Rogers spaceships in kindergarten at the age of seven or eight and later admired the SF work of Virgil Finlay and Ed Cartier, but also the astronomical art of Chesley Bonestell. His own first professional work was in ‘Weird Tales’ November 1950 and he went on to produce covers for most of the major publishers – Daw, Ace, Lancer, et al – and famous writers, including Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Van Vogt, Pohl and Anderson. He has won the Hugo Award for ‘Best Artist’ 11 times! He gave us sleek spaceships, humanoid robots, entertaining aliens, weird landscapes and (lots of!) exotic women.

Kelly has said that he considered himself to be mainly an illustrator, but he was also a fine artist and portraitist and his work is avidly collected. He also worked on TV backgrounds, commercials and animations. One of Kelly’s best-known – one might even say iconic – images was a cover for a 1953 Astounding magazine, illustrating a story by Tom Godwin: ‘The Gulf Between’.

This showed a giant robot holding a bloodied, dead man in his hand; in 1977 he was asked to re-paint this as the cover for the ‘News of the World’ album by the rock group Queen, incorporating members of the band. Also well-known is his green ‘Martian’ leaning through a keyhole, originally done for Fredric Brown’s ‘Martians, Go Home’, but later used as the cover of a collection of his work entitled ‘The Art of Science Fiction’ (Donning, 1977). A more recent (and better) collection is ‘As He Sees It’ (Paper Tiger, 2000).

Another string to Kelly’s bow was comic art. During the 1950s, he worked on ‘Mad’ magazine, for which he was the chief cover artist. He produced many brilliant portraits, and helped to make the Alfred E. Neuman character world-famous with his freckles, gap-toothed grin and the phrase, ‘What? Me Worry?’ In all of these fields his style influenced two generations of artists and designers and he will be much missed. Fortunately, he will live on through his art.

David A. Hardy

January 2004
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on June 07, 2005, 09:29:29 AM
Andre Norton 1912-2005

<Must say this was quoted from the web sitem, Unforuntatly I haven't knowingly read any of her stories. But I'm going to look for them. Found out in the most recent copy of Dragon  (D&Dmagazine)>

Say the name to someone who's read her, and watch the flash in their eyes. There's something about Andre Norton. She calls herself an old-fashioned storyteller and, indeed, whether it's fantasy, science fiction, adventure, romance or any other genre of popular literature, she manages to capture the audience's attention in the gracious style of the long-gone bardic masters. This quality, acknowledged by both the readers and critics has given her the title of the Grand Dame of Science Fiction and Fantasy.
 
She's often classified as a writer for young adults, but maybe that should be restated as for the "young-at-heart". Anyone, either gender, or any age, who enjoys great, emotional stories will find at least one segment of her enormous range of writing to treasure.

But there's something beyond skillful plots and incredibly imaginative settings. Something intangible that fuses her writing into the pillars and archways of your soul. The Lady, as her fans call her, reaches the hearts of people like no one else.

Most readers are in their teens when they first find her. And for those that do, it's like falling through a secret door into a universe of other worlds. Wild, beautiful worlds where being different is no crime, and great, courageous hearts overcome their own fears and prove stronger than evil, and find a place.
 
It has been said that science fiction is primarily philosophy, expounding the right to be different. Nowhere is that truer than in Ms. Norton's writing, where protagonists of many ethnicities have shown their intelligence and valor, and the value of all living things is affirmed.

The critics weren't quick to support her. But eventually they began to notice the consistent quality of her work. Today she is one of SF-F's most lauded female authors, the first woman to receive the Gandalf Grand Master of Fantasy and the Nebula Grand Master Award.

Her success paved the way for other women to write in those fields. Writers such as C.J. Cherryh, Anne McCaffrey and Mercedes Lackey are inheritors of Andre Norton's legacy.

Although her work has encompassed many genres, Andre Norton is probably most famous for her fantasy, in particular the Witch World series, begun in 1963 with the Hugo-nominated book of the same name. The popularity of the Witch World series has been so great that Ms. Norton continued it, to please her readers, to an incredible 35 books.

---------------------

The Andre Norton web site. (http://www.andre-norton.org/)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Val on June 11, 2005, 05:38:20 PM
Andre Norton? Oh yeah, heard about her at least, but have never read anything by her. All I know is that she had quite a popularity, so well, definitely a loss to the genre. But, 93 years is quite an old age...
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Shifty on July 20, 2005, 07:24:40 PM
James Doohan, AKA Montgomery Scott, chief engineer on the original Star Trek, died today from Pneumonia and complications from Alzheimer's at age 85.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on July 20, 2005, 11:30:10 PM
A sad day, more on "Scotty" from Bob Thomas, AP


'Star Trek' Star James Doohan Dies
By BOB THOMAS, AP

   
James Doohan will always be known for his role of Scotty on 'Star Trek.'


Talk About It: Post Thoughts  
   
LOS ANGELES (July 20) - James Doohan, the burly chief engineer of the Starship Enterprise in the original "Star Trek" TV series and motion pictures who responded to the command "Beam me up, Scotty," died early Wednesday. He was 85.

Doohan died at 5:30 a.m. at his Redmond, Wash., home with his wife of 28 years, Wende, at his side, Los Angeles agent and longtime friend Steve Stevens said. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, he said.

The Canadian-born Doohan was enjoying a busy career as a character actor when he auditioned for a role as an engineer in a new space adventure on NBC in 1966. A master of dialects from his early years in radio, he tried seven different accents.

"The producers asked me which one I preferred," Doohan recalled 30 years later. "I believed the Scot voice was the most commanding. So I told them, 'If this character is going to be an engineer, you'd better make him a Scotsman."'

The series, which starred William Shatner as Capt. James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as the enigmatic Mr. Spock, attracted an enthusiastic following of science fiction fans, especially among teenagers and children, but not enough ratings power. NBC canceled it after three seasons.

When the series ended in 1969, Doohan found himself typecast as Montgomery Scott, the canny engineer with a burr in his voice. In 1973, he complained to his dentist, who advised him: "Jimmy, you're going to be Scotty long after you're dead. If I were you, I'd go with the flow."

"I took his advice," said Doohan, "and since then everything's been just lovely."

"Star Trek" continued in syndicated TV both in the United States and abroad, and its following grew larger and more dedicated. In his later years, Doohan attended 40 "Trekkie" gatherings around the country and lectured at colleges.

The huge success of George Lucas's "Star Wars" in 1977 prompted Paramount Pictures, which had produced "Star Trek" for TV, to plan a movie based on the series. The studio brought back the TV cast and hired a topflight director, Robert Wise. "Star Trek - The Motion Picture" was successful enough to spawn five sequels.

The powerfully built Doohan, a veteran of D-Day in Normandy, spoke frankly in 1998 about his employer, Paramount, and his TV commander:

"I started out in the series at basic minimum- plus 10 percent for my agent. That was added a little bit in the second year. When we finally got to our third year, Paramount told us we'd get second-year pay! That's how much they loved us."

   
 Scotty Remembered  
   
   
   
   
He accused Shatner of hogging the camera, adding: "I like Captain Kirk, but I sure don't like Bill. He's so insecure that all he can think about is himself."

James Montgomery Doohan was born March 3, 1920, in Vancouver, B.C., youngest of four children of William Doohan, a pharmacist, veterinarian and dentist, and his wife Sarah. As he wrote in his autobiography, "Beam Me Up, Scotty," his father was a drunk who made life miserable for his wife and children.

At 19, James escaped the turmoil at home by joining the Canadian army, becoming a lieutenant in artillery. He was among the Canadian forces that landed on Juno Beach on D-Day. "The sea was rough," he recalled. "We were more afraid of drowning than the Germans."

The Canadians crossed a minefield laid for tanks; the soldiers weren't heavy enough to detonate the bombs. At 11:30 that night, he was machine-gunned, taking six hits: one that took off his middle right finger (he managed to hide the missing finger on the screen), four in his leg and one in the chest. Fortunately the chest bullet was stopped by his silver cigarette case.

After the war Doohan on a whim enrolled in a drama class in Toronto. He showed promise and won a two-year scholarship to New York's famed Neighborhood Playhouse, where fellow students included Leslie Nielsen, Tony Randall and Richard Boone.

His commanding presence and booming voice brought him work as a character actor in films and television, both in Canada and the U.S. Oddly, his only other TV series besides "Star Trek" was another space adventure, "Space Command," in 1953.

Doohan's first marriage to Judy Doohan produced four children. He had two children by his second marriage to Anita Yagel. Both marriages ended in divorce. In 1974 he married Wende Braunberger, and their children were Eric, Thomas and Sarah, who was born in 2000, when Doohan was 80.

In a 1998 interview, Doohan was asked if he ever got tired of hearing the line "Beam me up, Scotty."

"I'm not tired of it at all," he replied. "Good gracious, it's been said to me for just about 31 years. It's been said to me at 70 miles an hour across four lanes on the freeway. I hear it from just about everybody. It's been fun."

Funeral arrangements were incomplete.


07/20/05 11:54 EDT

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Shifty on July 22, 2005, 04:50:40 AM
Woah, I had no idea he was at Juno. Man, he's just earned quite a few notches of respect from me.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Lady Mara of the Acoma on August 03, 2005, 02:30:37 AM
[span style=\'color:beige\']Since the subject has been launched, let us remember dear Richard Harris a whole actor.
Born: 1 October 1930
Limerick, Ireland
Died :25 October 2002
London, England, UK. (hodgkin's disease)

He played in fantasy films like "Camelot", (musical) "Robin and marian", "Gulliver's travels", many Shakespearean tragedies and of course "Harry Potter", more recently !

A sad thing  all this and we'll all go through it !
We miss you Richard !

Mara, not too valiant ![/span]
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on October 15, 2005, 11:34:49 AM
following on from the death of Scotty the BBC have an article about how his ashes are being sent into space.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/t...dio/4344384.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/tv_and_radio/4344384.stm)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on November 02, 2005, 01:40:32 AM
Michael Piller the co-creater of Star Trek DS9 and writer / producer on many other Star Trek series & Films has died of cancer at the age of 57. To read more about this sad loss  go here. (http://www.trektoday.com/news/011105_01.shtml)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Zyxthior on November 09, 2005, 10:44:25 PM
Keith Parkinson passed away on Oct 26, 2005.  If you haven't heard of him then you've never looked at many of the art covers of the books we read, the original TSR D&D illustrations, or played Everquest (which was designed around his art).

Info:  http://www.darkswordminiatures.com/ (http://www.darkswordminiatures.com/)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on February 08, 2006, 03:42:20 PM

I know its late but I just found out that Jack Chalker died last year.  

It's a shame. I love the Well World novels he wrote.

Since 1978 he made his living solely by writing and published over 60 science fiction or fantasy novels and anthologies. During their years of publication, Jack wrote a regular column on SF/fantasy small press for Fantasy Review and continued the column on an irregular basis in Pulphouse magazine.

A long time science fiction fan, he attended hundreds of conventions. As a SF professional, he stayed very accessible to fans. He was Toastmaster at the 1983 WorldCon, and co-chaired the 1974 WorldCon, Discon II. He was a 3-term treasurer of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).

His awards included the Dedalus Award (1983), The Gold Medal of the West Coast Review of Books (1984), Skylark Award (1985), and Hamilton-Brackett Memorial Award (1979).
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on February 15, 2006, 10:15:47 PM
Its with sadness that I must report that Andreas Katsulas, the actor known to SF fans as G'Kar on Babylon 5 has died of lung cancer. This is really sad news as he was an awesome actor.

More info can be read here. (http://www.scifi.com/scifiwire/index.php?category=0&id=34628)

What is it was B5 actors, Richard Biggs died in 04.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Boldar Blood on June 23, 2006, 05:32:24 AM
http://www.keithparkinson.com/main.php (http://www.keithparkinson.com/main.php)

One of my favorite fantasy artists of all time, Keith Parkinson, apparently passed away last October.





Edit..... Just read back on the first page someone posted this back in 2005.  HOW did I miss that one.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on July 28, 2006, 06:26:14 PM
David Gemmel has passed on. Author of Legend and other loved books, he died Friday, July 28th at the age of 57.

Source (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/5224868.stm)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on July 29, 2006, 09:03:37 AM
I read about his passing this evening and was very suprised. 57 is a very young age, and i'm sure he had plenty of life left in him if he had came through his surgery. It's such a shame, and also a shame too for me because I know I'm going to regret his passing more in the future (when i've finally read his work).
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on July 30, 2006, 11:38:09 AM
I only just saw this on the BBC website, this is a real shame as he was a great author and a nice man
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on July 31, 2006, 09:04:30 AM
.......  

Damn! He's going to be missed. When I'm lacking something to read I usually go back to his Drenai & Stripstrassi novels. *mutters*
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Mjhavok on September 13, 2006, 01:56:58 PM
I worry about my favourite authors dying for my own selfish reasons. Robert Jordan currently has amyloidosis which is serious but he says he will beat it. I hope he does. Can't wait for the finally of the Wheel of Time.

Get well soon RJ


If anything happened to R.E.F. I think I would have to invent a time machine and get some futuristic tech to bring him back.

Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Val on September 14, 2006, 02:03:43 AM
Yikes, just figured now that Gemell died. Great author he was, but the way he as a great author, he'll sure live on elsewhere. 57 years is indeed not the oldest of ages, but Douglas Adams was even unluckier, he died at age 49. Not to mention Robert E. Howard. Though Howard was a suicider, his legacy upon this world was ended at age 30 in a hometown he had never left in his life

Well, yea, I was shocked to hear that too, Mjhavok, that R.J. took ill. One of the authors I grew up man.

And one day it will be Ray. No man can live forever, and it is the burden of getting older that people that you looked up to pass away. For example, in 2004 two of my musical legends died: Terje "Valfar" Bakken (1978-2004) aged 25 of hypothermia, Ace "Quorthon" Forsberg (1966-2004), aged 37, of heart failure. Finally, 2005 saw the dath of "Folk Mother" Else Christensen (1914-2005), who had of course been one of the leading people in the revival of our religion, Odinism. But such is lifee, and it is time to move on.


And of course, people will always live on in people's hearts if they've done great things. Let me quote you a stanza from the Hávamál, one of the most important Odinist writings.

76
Cattle die, kindred die,
Every man is mortal:
But the good name never dies
Of one who has done well


((Original Icelandic:
76
Deyr fé,
deyja fraendur,
deyr sjálfur id sama.
En ordstír
deyr aldregi
hveim er sér gódan getur. ))

(Damn invision, wont display eth nor conjunct ae, so I had to correct it to d and ae)

And it's true. People are only really dead when their memory is forgotten.  

PS: Sorry if that post is a bit religiously hung, but I felt the Havamal quote fit in well...
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Halfniak on September 15, 2006, 01:48:12 AM
im really still angry at gemmel for dying on us. i havent even read half his stuff and like GO sed - you'' really appreciate the guy when you finished with his stuff, but then hes gone..
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Thant on September 15, 2006, 11:22:41 AM
Quote from: Halfniak
im really still angry at gemmel for dying on us. i havent even read half his stuff and like GO sed - you'' really appreciate the guy when you finished with his stuff, but then hes gone..

Yeah, its so arrogant of authors to die before they are ready with their life work. How can they be so selfish?

 
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on September 19, 2006, 04:01:54 AM
I don't think that's what he meant at all, Thant.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Dark Elf on February 16, 2007, 05:31:33 PM
a bit late, exuse me i didnt read anything of gemmel (so many fantasy authors)... trough probaly watched in his books in a local bookstore many times...

a shame many good people die young... including my own dad
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on September 17, 2007, 04:35:55 AM
It seems Robert Jordan has passed away. It is posted on his blog, (http://www.dragonmount.com/RobertJordan/?p=90) though it may take a while to load. I never read his books, but I know there are fans of his on the board.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Joann on September 17, 2007, 04:32:54 PM
RIP Robert Jordan

I just came over to see if you guys had heard the news and to share condolances

See you on the next turning of the Wheel

Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on September 17, 2007, 06:56:03 PM
Sad news, did he ever get close to finishing the Wheel of Time series?
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Jaszon, Duke of Krondor. on September 17, 2007, 07:16:17 PM
Quote from: coeshaw
Sad news, did he ever get close to finishing the Wheel of Time series?

He cut the set down from 2 more books to end to one when he was diagnosed, and he's been doing SOME work on the last book. He's also famously good note/record keeper so all the important plot points must be set out somewhere... i just hope someone comes along and finishes it =\ he MUST of made preparations for his death...
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on September 17, 2007, 08:32:23 PM
Server is down. Sort of funny. Didn't this guy burn his house down a little while ago?

Shame to see him gone though. Series should be finished!

Oh well, at least now I have a reason to pick up WoT again.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on September 17, 2007, 08:44:17 PM
This really blows.
My friends and I had always speculated that he might pass before finishing.

Truth be told I stopped reading his books around book 9, because there was never an end in sight.
Now I am sad to say there is........guess I'll start from the begining again.

RIP
James Oliver Rigney, Jr.
October 17, 1948 - September 16, 2007
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on September 17, 2007, 10:00:54 PM
Quote from: Darkon
Server is down. Sort of funny. Didn't this guy burn his house down a little while ago?
That was David Eddings I believe
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on September 17, 2007, 10:21:46 PM
[!--quoteo--][div class=\'quotetop\']QUOTE[/div][div class=\'quotemain\'][!--quotec--]James Oliver Rigney, Jr.[/quote]

That was his full name?!

<<James Oliver

Also, beyond trivia...

Here is the article on Yahoo. (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070917/ap_on_en_ot/obit_jordan)
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Wolf on September 18, 2007, 04:01:21 AM
It is truly a shame, and a loss to the genre.  
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on September 18, 2007, 09:45:21 PM
Quote from: coeshaw
That was David Eddings I believe

Ah ok. Well that's only for the better. Had he burned down his original manuscripts and then died, it would have been ugly if they wanted to have someone else finish the series. Which reminds me, does he have a heir to take over his work or does it all end here?
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Bacchus on September 19, 2007, 12:46:31 AM
damn. this really really blows. Robert Jordan was definitely one of the best fantasy writers ever, and it sucks that he never got to finish the series. i quite want to know how it ends
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Val on September 22, 2007, 05:45:43 PM
I'm bereft of what to say. Jordan was always one of those authors whose books would cheer me up in tough times, he was a good storyteller. Sad to see him leave this world.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Spuduka on September 22, 2007, 06:19:26 PM
A great loss to the fantasy comunity though unlike you guy's I don't think I will miss books I got fed up on Book 6.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Althalus on October 07, 2007, 03:51:50 AM
Appears i am a bit behind in the news department, i cant believe hes gone.  I always had hopes he would pull through, but alas it was not to be.

Hopefully someone can finish his series for him.

 
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on October 17, 2007, 12:21:33 AM
A big 'damnit' is due in this course. I can't believe RJ has passed away. I love his work too - it's a real bloody shame his life's work has not been completed. He's one of the few people on this damn planet I would of loved to meet too. *sighs heavily* I'm sad now...
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: The Squire Of Forest Deep on October 28, 2007, 01:34:07 AM
Just heard the bad news. I'm up to abouut book 4 in the series, as I have been for quite some time. It's really disappointing this has happened before he got to finish that elaborate plot he's been building for years. I'd hate to pass away before my life's work was finished, and that's on top of all the usual negative death stuff.

Quote from: Darkon
Ah ok. Well that's only for the better. Had he burned down his original manuscripts and then died, it would have been ugly if they wanted to have someone else finish the series. Which reminds me, does he have a heir to take over his work or does it all end here?

From what I've heard, he was practically on his deathbed telling his son what happens etc. I have a feeling we'll have a Christopher Tolkien situation.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on October 28, 2007, 06:33:01 PM
Quote from: The Squire Of Forest Deep
From what I've heard, he was practically on his deathbed telling his son what happens etc. I have a feeling we'll have a Christopher Tolkien situation.

Sounds good. With a bit of luck his son has writing skills as well.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Jaszon, Duke of Krondor. on October 28, 2007, 06:39:33 PM
I don;t even care if its well written anymore. they can release it as a bulletpoint list of facts and i'd be happy enough
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Delenn on November 30, 2007, 07:22:08 PM
I actually read this before I was on the membership rolls and thought I would give you all the official story.

Jordan wrote the ending of the entire series along time ago, and the last book was 2/3 done on top of that so really there is only a small section to be done. Of course in RJ's world thats a few hundred pages but anyway. His wife Harriot has been his editor from the very first book and is an accomplished author in her own right. His brother has been diligently taking notes for over a year and they were both prepared in a final marathon style rundown of the story by Jordan about 2 months before his death. Most likely you will barely even be able to tell it wasn't his work. Give them a bit of time to grieve and the book will be out.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on December 01, 2007, 06:06:13 PM
Now that's reassuring to read. Good ol' RJ.
Title: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Althalus on December 15, 2007, 11:42:56 PM
Extremely good to hear, pity RJ could not be there to see its completion.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Gorath on January 21, 2008, 03:11:32 PM
I just read Jordan's Wikipedia page, turns out Brandon Sanderson has been chosen to finish off the book, for a projected fall '09 (or spring, for us down under)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on March 04, 2008, 10:02:29 PM
Seems it is up to me to report another...

Gary Gygax, co-creator of Dungeons and Dragons, has passes away at 69. The article can be found here. (http://blog.wired.com/underwire/2008/03/report-gary-gyg.html)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on March 06, 2008, 04:10:53 AM
I guess he finally failed a saving throw.....
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on March 06, 2008, 02:02:34 PM
I'm glad you said it and not me, sarge.

It's a shame, without D&D I don't think I would have got in to fantasy to begin with.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on March 06, 2008, 05:08:54 PM
Hey the man was living on borrowed time.
He had a stroke some months back and was always a hard drinker and smoker.

I met the man about 20 odd years ago and even back then, from what I remember he looked older than his years.

Anyway I do concur with you Myd, that game fueled my love of fantasy works these many years now.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Spuduka on March 07, 2008, 08:00:09 PM
Sad day though I doubt most people wo play the game would know who he was. Never played myself but my older son was well into it. :elf_drow:
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on March 11, 2008, 12:17:10 AM
While I was into fantasy, indeed into the Forgotten Realms (a D&D offshoot), before I ever started playing Dungeons and Dragons, I still have to thank Gary Gygax for all the wonderful and oft hilarious memories I gained from playing.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on March 18, 2008, 11:17:13 PM
And again.

I don't have the article yet, but Arthur C. Clarke has passed.

Though there is this. (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5ijDA5bgxiHlTvS_r-SSjskS1Tq1wD8VG3BKO4)

EDIT:

Here is an article (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23697230/)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on March 18, 2008, 11:52:10 PM
A sad loss. I never read any of his books (not my thing, really), but you can't help but admire how important he has been for the genre.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on March 19, 2008, 08:44:33 AM
This is a sad loss, I have only read a few of his books but his ideas about space were revolutionary.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on March 19, 2008, 02:57:00 PM
A truly sad event  :depressed:

Another of my early inspirations. Although I passed  to reading "high fantasty" rapidly, Clarke, with R Heinlein were favorites.

I bet he kicked himself for not patenting the idea of geo-stationary satelites!
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on March 19, 2008, 03:27:25 PM
That is to bad, I myself like a few others here wasn't really into his work.
That being said, you can't deny his huge contribution to the scifi/fantasy genre.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: bats on April 10, 2008, 07:45:38 AM
Thanks for this line I was very surprised on who pass away I had no idea and it came to a bit of a shock
especially Andreas as he play G'Kat so well really give this Alien  so much life=like ,,and at times I didn't
know if he would bea Villian or a Goodie,,it was a great show and I miss Babylon 5.
   bats :soldier:
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on May 23, 2008, 03:03:14 PM
Here I go again...

Robert Aspirin has passed.

Link. (http://www.mythadventures.net/)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on November 05, 2008, 11:13:44 PM
Author Michael Crichton has passed away. He was, apparently, fighting a private battle against cancer.

I'm sure you'll see many articles (probably much better than the one I'm about to give), but this (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7711763.stm) is how I came across the news.

A sad loss.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on November 06, 2008, 02:02:00 PM
Not a "traditional" sci-fi author that first jumps to my mind but when you take in to account his books like The Andromeda Strain, Sphere, Jurassic Park, and Eaters of the Dead (addapted to film for The 13th Warrior)", definately.

The 1971 film version of The Andromeda Strain was one of the first sci-films I remember watching as a kid. A great movie!

Sad news.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on December 05, 2008, 10:20:27 PM
Well this just stinks..................



Sci-fi’s grand old man, Forrest J Ackerman, dies
By Associated Press
Friday, December 5, 2008


LOS ANGELES - Forrest J Ackerman, the sometime actor, literary agent, magazine editor and full-time bon vivant who discovered author Ray Bradbury and was widely credited with coining the term "sci-fi," had died. He was 92.

Ackerman died Thursday of heart failure at his Los Angeles home, said Kevin Burns, head of Prometheus Entertainment and a trustee of Ackerman’s estate.

Although only marginally known to readers of mainstream literature, Ackerman was legendary in science-fiction circles as the founding editor of the pulp magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland. He was also the owner of a huge private collection of science-fiction movie and literary memorabilia that for years filled every nook and cranny of a hillside mansion overlooking Los Angeles.

"He became the Pied Piper, the spiritual leader, of everything science fiction, fantasy and horror," Burns said Friday.

Every Saturday morning that he was home, Ackerman would open up the house to anyone who wanted to view his treasures. He sold some pieces and gave others away when he moved to a smaller house in 2002, but he continued to let people visit him every Saturday for as long as his health permitted.

"My wife used to say, ’How can you let strangers into our home?’ But what’s the point of having a collection like this if you can’t let people enjoy it?" an exuberant Ackerman told The Associated Press as he conducted a spirited tour of the mansion on his 85th birthday.

His collection once included more than 50,000 books, thousands of science-fiction magazines and such items as Bela Lugosi’s cape from the 1931 film "Dracula."

His greatest achievement, however, was likely discovering Bradbury, author of the literary classics "Fahrenheit 451" and "The Martian Chronicles." Ackerman had placed a flyer in a Los Angeles bookstore for a science-fiction club he was founding and a teenage Bradbury showed up.

Later, Ackerman gave Bradbury the money to start his own science-fiction magazine, Futuria Fantasia, and paid the author’s way to New York for an authors meeting that Bradbury said helped launch his career.

"I hadn’t published yet, and I met a lot of these people who encouraged me and helped me get my career started, and that was all because of Forry Ackerman," the author told the AP in 2005.

Later, as a literary agent, Ackerman represented Bradbury, Isaac Asimov and numerous other science-fiction writers.

He said the term "sci-fi" came to him in 1954 when he was listening to a car radio and heard an announcer mention the word "hi-fi."

"My dear wife said, ’Forget it, Forry, it will never catch on,’" he recalled.

Soon he was using it in Famous Monsters of Filmland, the magazine he helped found in 1958 and edited for 25 years.

Ackerman himself appeared in numerous films over the years, usually in bit parts. His credits include "Queen of Blood," ”Dracula vs. Frankenstein," ”Amazon Women on the Moon," ”Vampirella," ”Transylvania Twist," ”The Howling" and the Michael Jackson "Thriller" video. More recently, he appeared in 2007’s "The Dead Undead" and 2006’s "The Boneyard Collection."

Ackerman returned briefly to Famous Monsters of Filmland in the 1990s, but he quickly fell out with the publisher over creative differences. He sued and was awarded a judgment of more than $375,000.

Forrest James Ackerman was born in Los Angeles on Nov. 24, 1916. He fell in love with science-fiction, he once said, when he was 9 years old and saw a magazine called Amazing Stories. He would hold onto that publication for the rest of his life.

Ackerman, who had no children, was preceded in death by his wife, Wendayne.

© Copyright 2008 Associated Press. All rights reserved.


Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on December 18, 2008, 11:10:46 PM
More sad news for the Sci-fi community:

First lady of ‘Star Trek’ dead at 76
Majel Barrett Roddenberry died Thursday from leukemia, according to the Associated Press(By Mark A. Perigard).

Roddenberry, the wife of “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry, appeared in just about every incarnation of “Trek” over the decades. She played Nurse Christine Chapel in the original, Luxwana Troi in “Next Generation” and voiced the computer for just about every version, including J.J. Abrams’ big-screen reboot headed to the big screen next year.

She was one of the very few classic “Trek” stars to appear in the first pilot. She played “Number One,” the captain’s logical second-in-command. The network objected, saying audiences would never believe a woman could serve in such a high position, and she and her character were excised from the show. Producer Roddenberry transferred the character’s cerebral qualities to Leonard Nimoy’s Spock.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Roddenberry several years ago, and she was a delight, philosophical about her place and contributions to “Trek” and grateful to the fans for their support over the years.

As she ran down the many characters she played in the “Trek” universe, she mentioned Lt. M’Ress, the feline communications officer from the ’70s animated show (really, “Trek’s” lost child and damn good for its day and budget) and then purred in M’Ress’ distinctive voice.

And I lost it and started giggling.

Not my most professional moment, but it’s an interview I remember fondly. Majel Barrett Roddenberry was a class act. She will be missed.

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on December 20, 2008, 11:24:04 PM
Wow, thanks Brody. I had no idea she was who she was. I mean I knew who she was on the shows and the computer voice and all that, but I never knew she was also a Roddenberry. I used to watch the Trek animated series as a kid. That's too bad she passed. :cry:
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on January 15, 2009, 05:01:51 PM
Great actor gone.....and who knew he was actually an American!
(CBS/AP)
Patrick McGoohan, an actor who created and starred in the cult classic TV show "The Prisoner," died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a short illness. He was 80.

His son-in-law, film producer Cleve Landsberg, announced the news Wednesday.

McGoohan starred in the 1960s CBS series "Secret Agent," and won two Emmys for his guest appearances on the detective drama "Columbo." Most recently he appeared as King Edward Longshanks in the 1995 Mel Gibson Academy Award-winning film "Braveheart."

But he was most famous as the character known only as Number Six in "The Prisoner," a 1968 British series about a spy who resigns from the intelligence service, only to be abducted and held captive in a mysterious haven known as The Village. There his overseers strip him of his identity in their attempts to glean information, while thwarting his attempts to escape.

Prior to "The Prisoner," McGoohan starred in "Secret Agent" (also known as "Danger Man"), which debuted in 1964, and whose memorable theme song seemed to speak of the hazards facing the characters in both series ("They've given you a number, and taken away your name").

McGoohan's agent, Sharif Ali, said Wednesday that the actor was still active in Hollywood, with two offers for wide-release films on the table when he died. "The man was just cool," Ali said. "It was an honor to have him here and work with him. ... He was one of those actors, a real actor. He didn't have a lie."

Born in New York on March 19, 1928, McGoohan was raised in England and Ireland, where his family moved shortly after his birth. He had a busy stage career before moving to television, and won a London Drama Critics Award for playing the title role in the Henrik Ibsen play "Brand."

He married stage actress Joan Drummond in 1951. The oldest of their three daughters, Catherine, is also an actress.

After "Secret Agent"'s success," McGoohan pitched to producers the surreal and cerebral "The Prisoner" to give himself a challenge. McGoohan also wrote and directed several episodes of the series.

Although only 17 episodes were made, it became a cult favorite, and its cultural impact continues, as evident by his guest appearance playing Number Six in a 2000 episode of "The Simpsons."

The show is being remade as a series for AMC to premiere later this year.

"His creation of 'The Prisoner' made an indelible mark on the sci-fi, fantasy and political thriller genres, creating one of the most iconic characters of all time," AMC said in a statement Wednesday. "AMC hopes to honor his legacy in our re-imagining of 'The Prisoner.'"

Later came smaller roles in film and television. McGoohan won Emmys for guest spots on "Columbo" 16 years apart, in 1974 and 1990.

His film credits include "Ice Station Zebra," the 1979 Clint Eastwood film "Escape from Alcatraz," the John Grisham courtroom drama "A Time To Kill," "Silver Streak," and "Scanners." He also starred in the 1963 Disney TV film "The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh," playing an 18th century English country priest who thwarts the king's minions as a disguised avenger.

His last major role was in "Braveheart," in what The Associated Press called a "standout" performance as the brutal king who battles Scottish freedom fighter William Wallace, played by Gibson.

In his review of the film for the Los Angeles Times critic Peter Rainer said "McGoohan is in possession of perhaps the most villainous enunciation in the history of acting."

McGoohan is survived by his wife and three daughters.


© MMIX, CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on April 20, 2009, 01:46:00 AM
Two this time around.

Dave Arneson, co-creator of Dungeons and Dragons passed in early April, but the news was not quite as widespread as the death of Gygax. An article, from Wizards of the Coast, can be found here (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/4news/20090409).

-----

Though I have not read any of his works and I have not watched either of the movies created from two of his better known ones--Empire of the Sun and Crash (although I lied, I saw a few minutes of this when I was rather younger and it did not interest me). If you do not recognize the two titles, they began as books written by author J.G. Ballard. An article can be found here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/8007331.stm).
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: tillyjayne82 on June 03, 2009, 05:17:54 PM
I have just discovered from the Feist Mailing list that David Eddings has died aged 77, very sad indeed.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on June 03, 2009, 05:47:05 PM
I have just discovered from the Feist Mailing list that David Eddings has died aged 77, very sad indeed.

When I was a kid he was one of my favorites, I recently re-read all his books last summer after my surgery.  :(
More on Eddings....

David Eddings Is Dead
Wednesday June 3, 2009

David Eddings
 
Beloved and influential fantasy author David Eddings, who in tandem with his late wife Leigh managed to garner both commercial and critical success with several series of best-selling novels, has passed away at the age of 77.

Eddings is best known for The Belgariad series, the first installment of which, The Pawn of Prophecy (1982), prompted Lester del Rey to tell him, "You've written a classic." The series introduced many to fantasy, and inspired some to write themselves (including Stephen Hunt, whose tribute to Eddings is here). Eddings was himself inspired by the success of The Lord of the Rings, which he was startled to discover was in its 78th printing when he encountered a display copy in a bookstore.

The Eddings' work includes The Belgariad series (5 books, 1982-1984) and The Malloreon series (5 books, 1987-1991), with three related books in the 1990s; The Elenium and The Tamuli (two trilogies, 1989-1994); and The Dreamers series (4 books, 2003-2006).

Eddings was famously old-fashioned, never using a typewriter or computer (he wrote out his scripts in long-hand) and was well-known for being self-effacing, once remarking, "I'm never going to be in danger of getting a Nobel Prize for literature." He was most pleased when told that his books had turned nonreaders into booklovers. "I look upon this as perhaps my purpose in life," he explained in a 1997 interview. "I am here to teach a generation or two how to read. After they've finished with me and I don't challenge them any more, they can move on to somebody important like Homer or Milton."

When asked in a recent interview what made his books so successful, Eddings replied with the same answer many of his fans would give: "Characters. My people are as real as I can make them."
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on June 04, 2009, 09:50:41 AM
Gemmell, Jordan and now Eddings.
That blows! :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on June 04, 2009, 04:52:50 PM
Okay so maybe not a loss to THIS genre, but a loss none the less.

Actor David Carradine found dead

From Jack Hannah
CNN
     
(CNN) -- American actor David Carradine has been found dead in a Bangkok, Thailand, hotel, according to his personal manager, Chuck Binder.

David Carradine became famous in the 1970s after starring in the television series "Kung Fu."
Binder said Thursday that the death is being investigated but could provide no other details.
Carradine's death was "shocking and sad. He was full of life, always wanting to work ... a great person," Binder told People magazine.
Carradine, who became famous in the 1970s when he starred in the television series "Kung Fu," was 72.
Modern audiences may best know him as "Bill" in Quentin Tarantino's "Kill Bill" films. Share memories of David Carradine
His career included more than 100 feature films, two dozen television movies and theater work, according to the Internet Movie Database.

***There are initial reports coming out of Thailand that he hung himself***
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on June 04, 2009, 05:48:02 PM
Beat me to it. Carradine though did dabble in some Sci-Fi stuff.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: coeshaw on June 09, 2009, 11:36:26 PM
Shame about Eddings, not that I had ever read his books but he was one of the big fantasy writers.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on June 25, 2009, 07:31:29 PM
I feel this falls under the "fantasy" aspect if you know what I mean.......and you'd probably have to be my age to think so but still....this sucks!


Farrah Fawcett dies
Jun 25, 2009, 12:51 PM | by Pop Watch

Categories: Legacy, Movies, News, Television

 Actress Farrah Fawcett died on June 25 in Los Angeles at the age of 62. With her passing after a long battle with anal cancer, we lose one of the quintessential symbols of post-feminist Hollywood, a definitive pinup who somehow parlayed a delicate-flower demeanor and all-American beauty into a 30-year career.

“After a long and brave battle with cancer, our beloved Farrah has passed away," Fawcett's longtime companion Ryan O'Neal said via a statement. "Although this is an extremely difficult time for her family and friends, we take comfort in the beautiful times that we shared with Farrah over the years and the knowledge that her life brought joy to so many people around the world."

As it turned out, her bravest role of all was her final one: She shared every brutally unglamorous step of her cancer treatment with the world in the riveting NBC documentary Farrah's Story. Perhaps most touchingly, the film gave its 9 million viewers a glimpse of her extraordinary love affair with O’Neal, who has supported her throughout treatment -- and even told Barbara Walters on a recent 20/20 that he’d finally asked her to marry him after nearly 25 years together: “We will, just as soon as she can say yes.”

Craig J. Nevius, producer of Farrah’s Story and the 2005 reality show Chasing Farrah, said in a statement: "Farrah was and is the true definition of an ‘icon.’ She was of her time but transcended her time....Not many stars can be credited with inspiring both a hair style and changes in legislation (surrounding domestic violence and more recently patient privacy). And she did it without posturing or campaigning but by simply choosing her own path and making her own rules.”

The former University of Texas sorority girl became an instant star when she sashayed onto Charlie’s Angels in 1976. (Her trademark poster -- shot pre-Angels -- hit stores that same year, cementing her role as a sex symbol.) Fawcett left the show after only one season, and, after a string of big-screen flops, finally earned critical praise in the mid '80s with the off-Broadway play Extremities and the NBC movie The Burning Bed. (Her role, as an abused wife, earned the actress her first Emmy nomination.)

In 1985, Fawcett -- divorced from Six Million Dollar Man Lee Majors -- struck up her romance with O’Neal, and the two had a son, Redmond James O’Neal. Throughout the next decade, she attracted plenty of critical praise for her on camera work, including 1997’s The Apostle and 2000’s Dr. T and the Women. But she also engaged in her share of public foibles -- a naked-body-painting layout in a 1995 Playboy, a famously addled appearance on David Letterman’s Late Show in 1997. She even tried to tell her own story in 2005 with the short-lived TV Land reality series Chasing Farrah, to roundly dismissive reviews.

In 2006, Fawcett was diagnosed with anal cancer. After undergoing chemotherapy and radiation, the actress was cancer-free. Unfortunately, doctors found the disease had returned in 2007. Even as her treatment resumed -- and family's drug battles continued to make headlines -- Fawcett managed to maintain an upbeat outlook. As Alana Stewart, friend and co-producer of Farrah's Story, told EW.com in April, "She’s always been positive. Her spirits have always been good throughout this ordeal."

In lieu of flowers the family has asked that donations to support cancer research be made to The Farrah Fawcett Foundation c/o P.O. Box 6478, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. --Jennifer Armstrong (Additional reporting by Jeff Jensen, Dan Snierson, and Tim Stack)

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on July 13, 2009, 07:47:31 PM
Charles Nikki Brown (born June 24, 1937 in Brooklyn, NY; died July 12, 2009)
He was the founder and editor of Locus, a news and reviews magazine dealing with the science fiction and fantasy genres of literature. He was born on June 24, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York. He served in the United States Navy and worked as a nuclear engineer before becoming a full time science fiction editor in 1975. Brown and Locus magazine have been frequent winners of the Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine.

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on July 13, 2009, 08:05:03 PM
Incredibly old news this - three years old, in fact - but I just read that Mako (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mako_(actor)) died. I was watching Avatar before, and recognised his voice quickly. He's got to have had one of the most distinctive voices going. He did a lot of work during his career, but I particularly enjoyed him in the Conan the Barbarian film.

He has a star on the Hollywood walk of fame, apparently. Has to be one of the very few I'd actually like to take a photo of. :neutral:
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Kikori on July 14, 2009, 08:46:38 AM
Really?!?!! Mako died???! Shit man. What a shame. I'll have to have a Samurai Jack marathon!!!!
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on August 07, 2009, 01:34:14 AM
Does John Hughes count?

His writer/director/producer credits reads like an imdb list of every hit movie from the 80's - 90's

Wierd Science
16 candles
breakfast club
Ferris Beullers day off
planes trains and automobiles
uncle buck
home alone
mr mom
etc.

Too bad. He was only 59.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on August 13, 2009, 08:58:28 PM
OK, definitely not a member of the genre, but a man to be respected and honored.

Les Paul has died. If you have ever listened to or liked music from about the 1940's on, he has affected you. He is the inventor of the modern ('the' really) solid body electric guitar.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_obit_les_paul;_ylt=Att2YU9vyyAaZgqUc7..sQwDW7oF (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_obit_les_paul;_ylt=Att2YU9vyyAaZgqUc7..sQwDW7oF)

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on November 29, 2009, 10:04:59 PM
English Fantasy author, Robert Holdstock, passed away today, at the age of 61, after having spent the last week in hospital in a coma.

His books were critically very well-regarded and I'm sorry to see him leave this world.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on November 29, 2009, 11:05:31 PM
I have his first book, Mythago Wood, currently in the mail heading towards me. Look forward to reading it. The coma, by the way, was brought on by a very bad E. Coli infection and for a while there, he seemed to be on the mend, but obviously we know the outcome.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on December 02, 2009, 06:24:17 AM
Another highly regarded author died today - Milorad Pavić. Another author I've not read, but it's unfortunate to lose artists so obviously talented.

Heart-attack. Lived until 81. :/
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on December 29, 2009, 05:13:51 PM
Dan O'Bannon has passed (a couple weeks ago actually).

he co-wrote 'Alien' as well as a bunch of other stuff.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Sgt.Brody of Ironpass on January 28, 2010, 08:20:51 PM
Not that he wrote Sci-fi, but JD Salinger died today at 91.
Died of natural cause in his home in New Hampshire.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on January 28, 2010, 08:31:22 PM
I was just about to announce that, Brody. Passing away at 91 isn't bad.

Apparently he was very reclusive. A man after my own heart. RIP
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Alrin on January 28, 2010, 11:22:18 PM
Hey there Salinger, What did you do?
Just when the world was looking at you
To write anything, that meant anything
You told us you were through
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on January 31, 2010, 11:04:13 PM
Kage Baker passed away this morning due to cancer. Rest in peace. :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on November 29, 2010, 06:30:11 PM
Irvin Kershner, Director of "Empire Strikes Back" among other things has passed

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101129/ap_en_mo/us_obit_irvin_kershner (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101129/ap_en_mo/us_obit_irvin_kershner)


I was actually more affected by the passing of Leslie Nielson to tell the truth. Big fan of the "Airplane" and "Naked Gun" movies. (which should put any rumors that I have any taste at all to rest)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on November 29, 2010, 07:16:25 PM
John Steakly also died, as well as Leslie Neilsen--the former best known for the novel, Armor, and the latter... well, you all know his roles, some of which were genre related.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on November 29, 2010, 07:39:43 PM
I know which film I'll be watching tonight.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on March 26, 2011, 08:16:16 PM
Diana Wynne Jones passed last night.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on November 23, 2011, 03:05:34 AM
Anne McCaffrey suffered a stroke and passed away in her home in Ireland.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on March 05, 2012, 06:05:53 PM
Ralph McQuarrie has passed, concept artist and credited as one of the leading influences for some of the characters in Star Wars.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/04/showbiz/star-wars-death/index.html?hpt=hp_bn4 (http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/04/showbiz/star-wars-death/index.html?hpt=hp_bn4)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on March 12, 2012, 06:39:46 PM
Dropping like flies  :ashamed:

Moebius

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/03/moebius-the-visionarys-visionary (http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/03/moebius-the-visionarys-visionary)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on June 06, 2012, 04:45:10 PM
Ray Bradbury has passed away. :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on June 06, 2012, 05:47:00 PM
Ray Bradbury has passed away. :(

That sucks. I always kinda liked "Something Wicked This Way Comes" and the Martian Chronicles if not my favorite I respect as historically important to the SF genre.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on July 28, 2012, 08:58:32 PM
Never watched (or enjoyed when i did) Dr. Who... but for those who might have....

"Mary Tamm, best known for playing the Doctor’s companion, Romana, on Doctor Who from 1978 to 1979, died yesterday after a protracted struggle with cancer."

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/07/either-qromanaq-or-qfredq-remembering-mary-tamm (http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/07/either-qromanaq-or-qfredq-remembering-mary-tamm)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on August 15, 2012, 04:22:00 PM
Oh Damn. Harry Harrison passed away. :(

Stainless Steel Rat,
Deathworld Series (one of my favorites as a lad)
Bill the Galatic Hero.
Star world, Wheel world and Home World.

Harry Harrison, who has died aged 87, was a writer from the world of American comics and science-fiction magazines of the 1950s. An amazingly prolific author, who gradually took on more serious themes as he matured, Harrison is probably best known for the book that inspired the Hollywood film Soylent Green (1973).

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/aug/15/harry-harrison (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/aug/15/harry-harrison)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on December 27, 2012, 05:14:12 PM
Gerry Anderson has passed. Those (all?) of you younger than I am probably will not remember or know of it, but I loved "Space 1999" as a kid.

http://io9.com/5971268/rip-gerry-anderson-creator-of-space-1999-and-thunderbirds (http://io9.com/5971268/rip-gerry-anderson-creator-of-space-1999-and-thunderbirds)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on May 08, 2013, 02:08:52 AM
Sad passing of Ray Harryhausen, famous special effects guy. Most notable achievements were recognised as Clash of the Titans, Jason and the Argonauts, etc.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/945728_10152863689160565_1568750059_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Bacchus on May 31, 2013, 11:12:37 AM
Jack Vance. can remember reading some of his books when i was younger
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on June 10, 2013, 08:27:58 PM
Iain Banks. :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: vega1 on June 30, 2013, 05:07:04 PM
Richard Matheson, author of 'I Am Legend' and numerous other things big and small passed last week.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on September 09, 2014, 10:30:30 PM
Graham Joyce (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Joyce) (1954-2014) passed away at the age of 59. He was diagnosed with lymphoma last year.

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on March 12, 2015, 04:49:01 PM
With great sadness, I just heard that my favourite author died. :( Sir Terry Pratchett is no more.

Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Bacchus on March 22, 2015, 03:39:04 PM
aye, this took me by surprise as well. didn't know he was sick to begin with, but still
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on March 22, 2015, 04:53:07 PM
I was aware of his sickness, but he seemed to deal so well with it, keeping his writing going, having an assistant, etc. that it really came as a surprise. I'm still curious as to what exactly was the cause of death, infection or his Alzheimer. Assisted suicide (euthanesia) was ruled out.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Dodyn Olynfyw on March 22, 2015, 06:49:29 PM
When Terry Pratchett died I found it especially difficult being a keen follower but also having had mixed feelings to his views on Dementia being a specialist carer for people with Dementia; but it is different caring for people with dementia to living with the affects of the brain damage. Given increased understanding of the affects of dementia on the brain and the fact that Alzheimers disease is a terminal illness makes it less likely in my opinion that cause of death will be attributed to the dementia or symptoms linked to it, saying that if your brain has progressively been damaged by the death of neurons it is likely that every symptom may end up be attributed to the dementia because the brain is such an important organ that controls all others. But after seeing many people die with dementia it is rear for people to say they died of dementia, I am glad that Terry Pratchett died surrounded by his family and demonstrated in my view showed that you can have a good end of life with dementia and through understanding adjust and prepare for death as you would with any other terminal illness. It's not that I'm opposed on the whole to euthanasia but I feel there is far more that can be done to improve the lives of people living with early stage dementia and prepare for the progression of the desiese, having people a round you that understand and help provide for your needs becomes far more important than most of the things we feel are important. Norm Macnimara is another activist living with Alzheimers desiese in the UK a very inspiring personality and very interesting to talk to or read his articles that said Terry Pratchett has greatly influenced opinion and understanding of dementia and this is the most important thing. He will be missed.

As you see I am very interested in this topic and I am going to ask whether anyone knows the cause of Terry Pratchett s death and discuss how we look at death with dementia because this interests me.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Dodyn Olynfyw on March 23, 2015, 07:54:29 PM
Ok after my continual professional development day on discrimination that people living with dementia experience as a result of there dementia but also due to many other reasons I have learned I was wrong to suggest terry prattchet died of Alzheimers disease when in fact he had posterior cortical atrophy and campaigned for recognition of this rare for me of dementia that affects younger people especially around their vision centres because of damage to the person with dementia s occipital lobe.
My tutor argued as I felt that there where very few causes of death that could not be attributed to the dementia, for example if someone with dementia died of a chest infection you could argue that without the effects of the dementia on their brain then they may have fought of the infection; because dealing with most problems when you have dementia is much more difficult - so in the past it was more likely to attribute a death to other causes it has become more common to attribute their death to dementia so it's like swings and roundabouts.

Terry Prattchet was a revolutionary writer and he really has made me consider the way I look at dementia and helped me see some uncomfortable truths also.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on June 11, 2015, 04:39:21 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-33098353

With sadness we morn the passing of horror and screen legend Sir Christopher Lee.  :( :( :( :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on June 11, 2015, 06:17:07 PM
Pity. 93 is a respectable age though.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Myddrun on January 11, 2016, 11:38:36 AM
Labrynth counts.

Shocked to hear of David Bowie's death this morning. I've had Space Oddity & Starman on endless loop in my head since I heard the news. :(
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Darkon on January 11, 2016, 01:31:54 PM
Seems fair to me.  I hope bats is doing well.

Can't say I have an interest in Bowie much. Could be me, could be I was too young to be exposed to him when he was very active.

Either way I hope he rests in peace.
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: Great One on January 14, 2016, 03:36:13 PM
RIP Alan Rickman

(http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20130508032313/degrassi/images/4/46/Lifeisntfair-snape.gif)
Title: Re: Loss to the Genre
Post by: James on June 29, 2018, 05:12:30 AM
Harlan Ellison passed away today.